TrainWeb.org Facebook Page
Page 1 - Fare Tickets; City of New York Transit Ephemera - Fiscal Issues
The Catalog of Transit Fiscal Ephemera & Exonumia from the City of the New York
(pre-MetroCard)
featuring the collections of George S. Cuhaj & Philip M. Goldstein

Page 1

 

.
Horse Drawn Stage & Omnibus Lines
1830 - ca. 1900
Pre-Unification - Street Railway & Subway
1850 - 1940
Bridge Tickets
1883 - 1950
.
First Unification
1940 to 1953
Second Unification
1953 to ?
Employees Passes
.

Horse Drawn Stage & Omnibus Lines (non-rail) - 19th Century
.

   Tickets were issued from the start of organized transportation in the mid-1800's, and were at that time prolific by issuer and variety. Being made of cardstock, the older the issue - the lower the odds of survivability.


Montague Street Cab Line
Mr. J. V. Dubernell, Clothier, was at this dual address from 1882-1886
2 1/4" x 1 3/16"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.




.
.
Croton Line

   The Croton Line went from South Ferry to 43rd Street, and was so named to honor the new water supply system and the holding reservoir at 42nd Street.
1 11/16" x 13/16"
.
.
15/16" x 1 1/4"

extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.
.

Broadway, Fourteenth Street and South Ferry Stage Line

1 7/8" x 1 1/8"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.
.

Fifth Avenue Stage Line
1 5/16" x 15/16"1 5/8" x 7/8
.
7/8" x 1 3/8"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.
.

Sixth Avenue Line
1 1/4" x 1 1/4"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.
.

Madison Avenue Stage Line
1" x 1 11/16"1 1/8" x 19/16"
1 15/16" x 1"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.

.

New York Consolidated Stage Company
2" x 1 3/16"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.

.
23rd Street Line

1 1/4" x 15/16"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.

All issues above and similar - extremely rare; $60.00 - $75.00 and higher, regardless of condition

.

.

   

Fare Tickets - pre-Unification

   These are the actual fare tickets purchased to enter the various railways, whether they be located upon the street, on elevateds, and later the subways. 

   Most tickets could be purchased individually for a single ride, or in multiples for later use, hence many being of the perforated ticket book type, and almost always 2" long by 1" wide. 

   After purchasing your tickets from the clerk in change / ticket booth (which was to become the colloquial token booth after 1953); but before entrance to actual subway or elevated platforms, you gave your ticket to a gateman, who deposited the ticket into a "chopper box" at the gate to the platforms of the Interborough Rapid Transit subway and main terminals of the surface cars.

   While some transit buffs are aware of the chopper boxes and surrendering your ticket to the gateman before before accessing the trains; that was not always the method for collecting fares on the elevated. 

   In "The First Elevated Railroads in Manhattan and the Bronx of the City of New York" by William Fullerton Reeves; he states: "In the early days of operating elevated roads, tickets were sold to prospective passengers at the stations, and collected on the trains by conductors. This method of "taking up tickets" was abolished January 20, 1879. In June 1880 came the canceling boxes where passengers deposited their tickets before entering a train. The straight all-day five-cent fare was introduced on all trains in October-November 1886.

   Described in further detail in the Proceeding of the American Society of Civil Engineers, August 1917;  is the following information also shown at right.

  • The first method for taking up fares, when the Manhattan Elevated first opened November 1875, conductors would walk the train taking up tickets; (same as long distance trains). 
  • As of January 20, 1879; the second method was to position chopper boxes and gatemen at the exit gates of the stations. 
  • This in turn was changed a year and a half later on June 21, 1880 to the chopper boxes and gatemen being placed at the entry gates.


      This would be the method that was kept in place until 1921, when the first turnstiles were adapted and placed throughout the system.

Columbus Circle Station; showing change / ticket booth; and gate separating "unpaid" and "paid" side of areas.Gateman with chopper box
Ticket Chopper Box at IRT Wall Street Station
image courtesy of ephemeralnewyork

   Incidentally, this gate as I have mentioned, separated the "paid" portion of the subway from the "unpaid" section and can be seen in the image above at left. 

   Inside the chopper box, and viewable through a glass window, was a set of interlaced metal teeth resembling combs. Connecting to these teeth combs, there was a shaft that connected through the side of the case to the outside. Much like the purpose of a modern paper shredder; only the chopper boxes were manually operated. The tickets deposited into the top portion, were chopped to prevent reuse and the shredded tickets contained in a hopper in the bottom portion of the chopper box pedestal. 

Broadway & Seventh Avenue Railroad Company
1 5/8" x 1 3/16"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.


.

Central Crosstown Railroad 
1875 - 1913


17th and 18th Streets Crosstown Streetcar
Christopher St. Ferry (Hudson River) to 23rd Street Ferry (East River)
1 7/8" x 1"

rare; $90.00 to $100.00

.


.

New York Elevated Railroad
1874 - 1879

(predecessor to Manhattan Railways)
Good for One Ten Cent Fare
National Bank Note Co.
.
.....
Conductors Check - Not good for fare
Once the on-train conductor lifted a ticket from the passenger,
this check was used as identification that a fare was paid.
J. A. Cowing, Treasurer
116 Street
J. A. Cowing, Treasurer

2" x 1"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.


.

Third Avenue Railroad
(late 1850s)
2 Cent ticket (often used for change)
1" x 1 7/16"
Good only from 65th Street UP to Yorkville and Harlem
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.


Sixth Avenue Railroad
.    .
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.


42nd Street and Grand Street Ferry Railroad Company
1 11/16" x 1 3/16"
extremely rare; $125.00 to $150.00

.


Manhattan Railway (as its own entity) - Elevated Division
1879 - 1903


As discussed at the beginning of this chapter, in "The First Elevated Railroads in Manhattan and the Bronx of the City of New York" by William Fullerton Reeves; he states: "In the early days of operating elevated roads, tickets were sold to prospective passengers at the stations, and collected on the trains by conductors.

   This method of "taking up tickets" was abolished January 20, 1879. In June 1880 came the canceling boxes where passengers deposited their tickets before entering a train. The straight all-day five-cent fare was introduced on all trains in October-November 1886.

   Described in further detail in the Proceeding of the American Society of Civil Engineers, August 1917;  is the following information shown at right.

   
This research helps date the 10 cent Metropolitan Railway tickets that follow to between 1879 and 1886.
1879 - November 1, 1886
Park Place Station at Church Street (Sixth Avenue Line)
Franklin Bank Note
Fulton or Franklin Street Station?
Franklin Bank Note

.
Commission Trains:
operating between the hours of 5:20 am to 7:20 am and 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm.
.  ..  .
Fulton or Franklin Street Station?

57th Street Station

14th Street Station (which Line?)
Hamilton Bank Note Engraving & Printing

.

November 1, 1886 to 1903
8th Street Station (Second or Sixth Avenue Line)
Hamilton Bank Note

Christopher Street Station (Ninth Avenue Line)
New York Bank Note

.
all issues above, uncommon; $35.00 - $45.00



Second Avenue Railroad (Surface)
1898 - 1908
96th Street to Harlem
Keller Print Co.
rare; $60.00 to $75.00




Interborough Rapid Transit - Subway Division
1903 - 1928
86th Street (with note on envelope)
Hamilton Bank Note

.
 Brooklyn Bridge Station
Globe Ticket Co.
Astor Place
Hamilton Bank Note Ticket Co.
Grand Central
Hamilton Bank Note
Columbia University
Hamilton Bank Note
.

Junius Street
Hamilton Bank Note
Atlantic Avenue
M. B. Brown Ptg & Bdg Co
Nevins St
M. B. Brown Ptg & Bdg Co
Extra
M. B. Brown Ptg & Bdg Co
US Government
M. B. Brown Ptg & Bdg Co
ticket back

These issues are much more common than the 10 cent counterparts. $20.00 - $30.00 per ticket
seen printed by Globe Ticket,  Hamilton Banknote and M. B. Brown PTG & BDG (Printing & Binding) Co.

Interborough Rapid Transit .- Manhattan Railway Division (Elevated Lines)
1903 - 1928

Rector Street (Sixth Avenue Line)
This piece is printed on paper as opposed to card stock.
It also states "to be detached in presence of agent or gateman"; leading us to conclude this was issued in strip or booklet form.
The Time Limit Patent Date is from August 23 or 28, 1898


rare; $40.00 to $45.00
.
145th Street Station at Eighth Avenue (Sixth Avenue Line)
Globe Ticket Co.

City Hall - (Third Avenue Elevated)
Hamilton Bank Note

Exchange for Special Transfer or Block Ticket,
issued at 180th Street - the Bronx

(Third Avenue Line?)
rare; $40.00 to $45.00rare; $40.00 to $45.00rare; $55.00 to $65.00

   



The Broadway Rail Road Co.
1858 - 1890s
1 11/16" x 1 1/4"
rare; $75.00 to $100.00






Brooklyn City Railroad Company
1853 - 1896
1 5/8" x 1"
New York Bank Note Co.
rare; $75.00 to $100.00





Brooklyn City & Newtown Railroad Company
1860 - 1910
1 7/16" x 1 1/8"
rare; $75.00 to $100.00





Brooklyn City, Hunter's Point & Prospect Rail Road Co.
(overprint on Greenpoint & Williamsburg Rail Road Co)
1864 - 1872
1 7/16" x 1 3/16"
rare; $60.00 to $75.00





Brooklyn Heights Railroad (Elevated)
1895 - 1899
Fare Receipt
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
rare; $40.00 to $50.00
.
BHRR lessee of Brooklyn Union Elevated
Elevated Ticket - Sands or High Street
(connection from New York & Brooklyn Bridge RR)
T. S. Williams, Secretary & Treasurer
Hamilton Bank Note
Valid for One Five Cent Fare
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer (printed signature field)
serial number on front
P.P. & C.I. R.R., Nassau Elec R.R. & B. U. Ele R.R.
Globe Ticket
Valid for One Five Cent Fare
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer (unprinted signature field)
serial number on back
Lessee B.C. R.R. B.U.E. R.R. & P.P. & C.I. R.R.
Hamiton Bank Note Eng & Ptg
rare; $40.00 to $50.00uncommon; $15.00 to $20.00uncommon; $15.00 to $20.00
.
Excursion Ticket
Coney Island to Brooklyn (39th Street)
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
Good for One Fare - (pair south & north)
Good For One Fare - South of 22d Ave or Kings Highway
Good for One Fare - North of Twenty-Second Ave. or Kings Highway
on Brighton Beach, Culver or Sea Beach Lines
These are commutation tickets purchased by local residents in the double fare zone that BRT so rigidly and physically enforced
from 1900 to 1919
rare; $40.00 to $50.00extremely rare; $75.00 to $90.00 for pair
individual tickets $20.00 - $25.00





Brooklyn & Rockaway Beach Railroad
1863 - 1906
intentionally left blank
Commutation Coupons - July 24, 1902
between Canarsie Landing and East New York

Henry H. Adams, President, H. J. Robinson, Treasurer
Canarsie Landing to East New York
William Warner, Superintendent
extremely rare; $75.00 to $100.00 on condition of quantity of tickets remaining.rare; $45.00 to $60.00





Brooklyn Elevated Railroad
1885 - 1899
(merged into Brooklyn Union Elevated)
Good for One Continuous Trip
Hamilton Bank Note Engraving & Printing
I. D. Barton, General Superintendant
Rockaway Beach to Chestnut St. Junction
all tickets above rare; $30.00 to $35.00





Brooklyn Union Elevated Railroad
1899 - 1912
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
Accepted by the
Brooklyn Heights RR Co.
Nassau Electric RR Co.
Brooklyn, Queens County & Suburban RR Co.
Coney Island & Gravesend Railway Co.
Sea Beach Railway Co.
South Brooklyn Ry. Co.
2" x 1"
very common; $5.00 to $10.00 based on condition





Kings County Elevated Railway
1888 - 1899


Hamilton Banknote & Engraving
From Sands St., Upper Station Only to any station K. C. E. Ry.
W. T. Goundie, General Manager
F. - P.R.- I.

all tickets above rare; $30.00 to $35.00






New Williamsburgh & Flatbush Rail Road Co.
1873 - 1896
1 1/2" x 1 1/8"
rare; $40.00 to $50.00





New York & Sea Beach Railroad
1877 - 1896
Special Excursion - June 27, 1885
Bay Ridge to Coney Island and return
with admit one to Sea Beach Palace Skating Rink
Bay Ridge to Coney Island - 1892
Alrick H. Man, Managing Director
.
Alrick H. Man, Managing Director
all rare; $50.00 to $75.00





New York Rapid Transit (Elevated & Subway)
1896 - 1923 (BRT)
1923 - 1940 (BMT)
circa 1923

common; $7.00 to $10.00





Prospect Park & Coney Island Railroad.
1873 - 1896
Conductors Memorandum (cash fare receipt) - May 23, 1896
Northbound Union Depot to 9th Avenue & 20th Street
printed by William H. Campbell
extremely rare - $50.00 to 65.00



Miscellaneous Passes & Tickets

New York & Queens County Railway
1896 - 1932
Brooklyn Heights Railroad (Elevated)
1895 - 1899
Brooklyn & Queens Transit, New York Rapid Transit
and South Brooklyn Railway (BMT)
1923 - 1940
T. S. Williams, Secretary & TreasurerHospital Ticket
Void after December 31, 1931
Surface Transit Corporation (subsidiary of Third Avenue Railway)
1941 - 1948

All tickets above, uncommon. $15.00 to $25.00 each


.
.
Far Rockaway Railroad

   This trolley line is believed to be one of the predecessors to Long Island Rail Road operations. Research shows it was consolidated into the South Side Railroad Company in September 1872. The South Side Railroad was a competitor to the Long Island, but could not compete in earnest. This company was in turn acquired by the Long Island Rail Road Company in January 26, 1876. 
1 5/8" x 15/16"
Hamilton Bank Note Co.
extremely rare - $45.00 to 60.00

   


Brooklyn Bridge - 1883 to 1950Williamsburg Bridge - 1904 to 1929 Queensboro Bridge - 1909 to 1956Manhattan Bridge - 1910 to

   A sub-set to the category of fare tickets, are the so called Bridge Tickets. These tickets were expressly issued for the surface or elevated lines that crossed any one of four bridges over the East River: Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan Bridge, Williamsburg Bridge and the Queensboro Bridge (of which was known as Blackwell's Island Bridge and the 59th Street Bridge).


   Before progressing to the bridge tickets used by the trolley and elevated lines, the following ticket issues must be discussed to avoid confusion.


Not a subway, elevated or cable car
transit fare ticket!


2" x 1"

"Promenade"

   There is a lot of misunderstanding and misinformation regarding the ticket issue for the Brooklyn Bridge seen at right. Since they to pertain to transit ephemera (but not trolley / elevated), I will include a brief description here.

   The Brooklyn Bridge opened to pedestrians, horse wagons and carriages on May 24th, 1883. 

   After the initial opening, pedestrians were charged to use the Promenade, or the wood plank walkway in the center of the bridge. These tickets are marked New York and Brooklyn Bridge "PROMENADE". They are NOT cable car or elevated tickets, but a ticket to walk across. A pedestrian toll ticket as it was.

   The PROMENADE tickets were sold in strips of twenty-five tickets for 5 cents; and were issued from January 31, 1885 through May 31, 1891, when that Promenade toll was abolished. They are unfortunately and erroneously listed as subway or trolley tickets. They were not.


2 ½" x 1 ½"
Carriageway

   Another variety of tickets seen for the Brooklyn Bridge (albeit extremely rarely), were the New York and Brooklyn Bridge carriage way toll ticket. Again, this was NOT a fare ticket for the elevated or surface lines that crossed the Brooklyn Bridge. It was a toll ticket for the horse and carriages. 

   The Promenade Tickets and the Carriageway Toll Tickets are further explained in depth on Page 2 of my associated website: nynjtollscrip.info.

   But to re-iterate, neither of these two issues were used for the railroad in any way shape or form.  If the tickets are not specifically marked "New York & Brooklyn Bridge Rail Road", then they were not for the railroad operation upon the bridge. 


   Unfortunately, we are not quite to discussing the railroad ticket issues yet. Another source of confusion is in reference to the types of railroad operations themselves upon the bridge.

   The bridge as designed, incorporated cable car lines across the bridge, and located in the inner most lanes of traffic, and directly flanking either side of the Promenade walkway. While it was intended to have the railroad opened for the grand opening of the bridge in May, difficulties concerning the grip mechanisms under the cable cars, meant cable car service could not start until September 25, 1883. 

   Furthermore, the cable system experienced frequent down time, such as sheave axles breaking; icy weather preventing good grip among other issues and the cable needed to be changed approximately every two to three years due to wear and fraying.

   Once up and running,
the tickets so marked "New York & Brooklyn Bridge Rail Road" (seen in the chapter below, and of which was in actuality a cable car line at first) are for the actual rail operations upon the bridge:

The Cable Railroad: September 1883 to November 1896

   Many factors resulted in the cable car lines ultimately being converted to electricity in November 1896: the troublesome cable and sheaves, the smoke and soot from the steam boilers to power the machinery to power the winches for the cable, as well as ash and cinder removal. The cable and machinery was not immediately removed upon conversion to electricity, but it would be. 

   The location of the cable car lines in relation to the bridge deck can be seen in the following diagram. This is the original configuration of the lanes upon opening:

PROMENADE
CARRIAGEWAYCARRIAGEWAYCABLE CARCABLE CARCARRIAGEWAYCARRIAGEWAY


the Cable Railroad is out, the Electric Elevated Cars are in: November 1896 to March 5, 1944

   On January 26, 1908, Brooklyn Bridge "Local" service using Elevated "El" Cars between the two ends of the bridge was introduced. These electric cars operated in 5 car sets, and replaced the cable cars of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge Rail Road, which were discontinued the following day. Brooklyn Rapid Transit (and its subsidiaries Brooklyn Heights Railroad, ) would assume operation of the bridge railroad from this point on as well.

EL CARSPROMENADEEL CARS

CARRIAGEWAY

CARRIAGEWAY

CARRIAGEWAY

CARRIAGEWAY


Trolley Lines: January 1898 to March 1950

   On January 23, 1898; the tracks of the Graham Avenue Line (a minor line approaching downtown from the east on Sands Street) was tied into tracks installed upon the bridge carriage way. As the line operated on 30 minute intervals, this line was chosen.

   After this, multiple trolley lines began offering cross bridge service to and from Brooklyn, and merged into this set of trolley tracks for connection over the bridge to various points in Manhattan; and likewise, trolley lines in Manhattan into Brooklyn. Withing a few short years, automobiles would be arriving on scene and become commonplace, they would be assigned to the two outer lanes of traffic to share with both horse drawn vehicles as well as the trolleys.

EL CARSPROMENADEEL CARS
CARRIAGEWAY / 
AUTOMOBILE
TROLLEY &
AUTOMOBILE
TROLLEY &
AUTOMOBILE
CARRIAGEWAY / 
AUTOMOBILE

   


   
   
   Beginning with the opening of the Williamsburg Bridge in 1904, and following with the opening of the Queensboro Bridge in 1909 and Manhattan Bridge in 1909 (although trolley service did not begin until the year after), many of the car lines transversing the Brooklyn Bridge would be rerouted over the new bridges to alleviate congestion of the Brooklyn Bridge. Remember, until 1904, the Brooklyn Bridge was the only direct connection between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and by proxy, Queens as well.

   Also, each bridge would have its own independent "Bridge Local Line" which in essence was a dedicated loop trolley operating from each bridges Manhattan Terminal to its Brooklyn or Queens Terminal.

   On March 5, 1944; elevated car service was terminated across the bridge; what with passengers traveling between the boroughs opting to take 'one seat' subway rides across the river. So the trolleys were moved onto those tracks, and now allowing for two dedicated lanes of automobiles in each direction. The very complex Park Row and Sands Street Terminals were razed to allow for automobile on ramps and interchanges. 

   As such, the Myrtle Avenue Elevated was one of the last Elevated lines to connect to the Bridge railroad, so passengers could now receive a continuing ride ticket from the Myrtle El to BMT subway station at Bridge & Jay Streets and vice versa to continue into and out of Manhattan (Continuing Ride Tickets & Transfers

TROLLEYPROMENADETROLLEY

AUTOMOBILE

AUTOMOBILE

AUTOMOBILE

AUTOMOBILE


   Streetcar / trolley use of the bridge ended in March 6, 1950 and the once dedicated rail "lane" was converted to carry automobile traffic:

PROMENADE
AUTOMOBILE    AUTOMOBILE   AUTOMOBILEAUTOMOBILE    AUTOMOBILE   AUTOMOBILE

   With that not-so-brief explanation of the Brooklyn Bridge rail configurations, we will now proceed (Yay!!!) to the fare payment methods. 

   As one can imagine, there are an abundance of tickets used for these bridge services and likewise, transfers to the extensive Brooklyn streetcar and elevated lines meeting at the Sands Street station and the Park Row Terminal in Manhattan..

   The cable car "Railroad" fare tickets was originally five cents for a single ride when it opened in October 1883. This fare was reduced in 1885 to three cents for individual tickets, five cents for two tickets or twenty-five cents for a strip of ten tickets (thus the different numbers found in the center on the back of single tickets).

   Connecting elevated lines at either terminal offered free transfer to the bridge elevated.    

   The December 28, 1895 edition of the New York Times carried this very interesting and informative piece on the bridge tickets. A veritable gold mine of technical information is contained. 

   With this article, we learn the types of issues for the railway: 3 cents (or single ride), 2 for 5 cents ( cent tickets for round trip tickets), and 10 for 25 cents (commutation tickets for frequent crossing).

   The companies contracted for the printing, quantities printed; collection and destruction methods. We now know the meaning of the large letters on the 3 cent tickets (the top letter was issued to one particular agent, the larger letter a series letter per each million tickets printed).

2½ cent tickets were issued for both for the Brooklyn Bridge elevated and / or surface lines, and the various companies that operated streetcar or elevated lines across the bridge. 

   These 2½ cent tickets were sold two for 5 cents and in multiples of two. The Bridge Division tickets were used on the elevated lines over the Brooklyn Bridge, until the elevateds were removed from the bridge in 1944. This elevated bridge line should not be confused with the streetcars / trolleys that also operated over the bridge, (and which remained as a means to cross the Brooklyn Bridge until 1950; at which time it became automobile only.)

New York and Brooklyn Bridge Railroad Tickets, pre-Unification
1883 to 1908

2" x 1"
pack of ten tickets for 25 cents"two-fers"
(two tickets for 5 cents)
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
Hamilton Bank Note and Engraving
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
Bell Punch & Printing, Bethlehem, PA (1894)
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
New York Bank Note
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
.T.A. Bradley, Phila
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
Hamilton Bank Note and Engraving
.

C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
Hamilton Bank Note and Engraving 

individual tickets above: common; $5.00 - $10.00.
50% premium for connected "two-fers".
A complete unbroken strip of 10 tickets is extremely rare. Worth at least the sum of the individual tickets ($100) plus a 25% premium.
.

.
3 cent "Strip" ticket3 cent "Strip" ticket
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
J - Series C (3,000,000)
uncommon, $35.00 - $45.00
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
F - Series E  (5,000,000)
uncommon, $25.00 - $30.00
C. C. Martin, Chief Engineer & Superintendant
B - Series X  (24,000,000)
New York Bank Note Co.
uncommon, $25.00 - $30.00
   For passenger convenience, this is a brass ticket holder marked "BRIDGE AND ELEVATED R.R. TICKETS", it has a hinged lid and fits the 1880's-1900's 2" x 1" tickets which were often sold in multiples. This keeps them safe from damage from other items in a pocket or purse.

.
seen in brass and copper nickel plated varieties
1 3/16" wide x 2 3/16" length by 1/4" thick
rare: $50.00 - $60.00

other pre-Unification operators of Bridge Lines (elevated & surface)
.
.
Brooklyn Heights Railroad
1899 to 1907
(Brooklyn Rapid Transit)
Park Row (Manhattan) and Sands Street (Brooklyn)
T. S. Williams, Secretary & Treasurer
Globe Ticket Co.
2 5/16" x 1 1/4"
rare; $35.00 to $40.00

.
.

Brooklyn Elevated Railroad
1885 to 1899
(to be acquired by and merged into BRT Brooklyn Union Elevated in 1899)
Park Row (Manhattan) and Sands Street (Brooklyn)
Geo. B. Cornell, Chielf Engineer & Gen'l Manager
Hamilton Bank Note Co.
2" x 1"
rare; $35.00 - $40.00
Bridge Ticket with Elevated Ticket
Bridge: Park Row (Manhattan) and Sands Street (Brooklyn)
Geo. B. Cornell, Chielf Engineer & Gen'l Manager (Bridge Ticket)

Elevated: Sands or High Street (Brooklyn) enterance from N.Y. & B. B.

I. D. Barton, General Superintendant
2" x 2"
attached pair: extremely rare; $60.00 to $75.00

.
.

Coney Island & Brooklyn Railroad
1883 to 1914
(was incorporated in 1860)
Bridge Division 2 1/2 cents
H. A. Crowe, General, Passenger Agent
rare; $35.00 - $40.00

Brooklyn Heights Railroad (Brooklyn Rapid Transit) (streetcar - Bridge Division)
1899 to 1907
(Brooklyn Rapid Transit)
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
2 5/16" x 1 1/4"
1/2 is 5/16" tall, 1 lacks serif

C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
2 5/16" x 1 1/4"
1/2 is 5/16" tall, 1 has serif

.
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
2 1/6" x 1 3/16"
1/2 is 9/32" tall, 1 has serif
(all above showing different prefixes)

common; $12.00 - $15.00

Brooklyn Union Elevated (Nassau Electric) (streetcar - Bridge Division)
1899 to 1912
C. D. Meneely, Secretary & Treasurer
2 1/6" x 1 3/16"
1/2 is 9/32" tall , 1 has serif

uncommon; $20.00 - $25.00
...
.


Brooklyn & Queens Transit Corp.
(BMT surface lines subsidiary)
1929 to 1940
Brooklyn & Queens Transit Corp. (Streetcar)
Park Row (Manhattan) and Sands Street (Brooklyn)
2 5/16" x 1 1/4"

common; $12.00 - $15.00
.
.

Brooklyn Bridge Tickets, First Unification;
1940 to 1950
New York City Transit System - BMT Division
Bridge Division B 2 ½¢ D
1 15/16" x 1 3/16"
N. Y. GLOBE TICKET CO., INC
New York City Transit System - BMT Division
Bridge Division B 2 ½¢ D
1 15/16" x 1 3/16"
N. Y. GLOBE TICKET CO., INC
common; $5.00 - $10.00
.
.
   With the removal of the elevated on the Brooklyn Bridge in 1944, and the streetcars in 1950; no second Unification tickets would exist for the Brooklyn Bridge. As far is known, no bus routes crossed the Brooklyn Bridge due to size and weight restrictions on the roadways: (10 feet and 8,000 pounds).

Manhattan Bridge Tickets

Three Cent Line
service started: 1912 to November 13, 1929
Manhattan Bridge 3¢ Line (type 1 - lavender)
Two Tickets for Five Cents
Edward T. Horwill, treasurer (1909 - September 8, 1924)
2" x 1"
Hamilton Bank Note Co.
Manhattan Bridge 3¢ Line (type 2 - orange, square corners)
Two Tickets for Five Cents
Edward T. Horwill, treasurer (1909 - September 8, 1924)
2" x 1"
Manhattan Bridge 3¢ Line (type 3 - orange, notched corners)
Two Tickets for Five Cents
Edward T. Horwill, treasurer (1909 - September 8, 1924)
2" x 1"
Manhattan Bridge 3¢ Line (type 4 - blue, notched corners)
Two Tickets for Five Cents
Walter Hammitt, treasurer (September 8, 1924 - 1929)
2" x 1"
Automatic Ticket Co.
.
.

Brooklyn & North River Railroad
1912 (service on bridge started 1915) to 1919
Brooklyn & North River Railroad
between Nassau Street (Brooklyn) and Bowery (Manhattan)
Edward W Maher, President
pre-1919

Williamsburg Bridge "Bridge Local" Tickets & Tokens
November 6, 1904 - December 6, 1948

City of New York - Department of Plants & Structures Bridge Railroad (Williamsburg Bridge)

1921 - 1949

   The New York City Department of Plants and Structures was a transit operator organized in September 1919 by Mayor John Hylan. The Department was charged with organizing six private entrepreneurs to operate "emergency buses" to replace four abandoned storage battery street car lines: the Madison Street Line; Spring and Delancey Street Line, Avenue C Line and the Sixth Avenue Ferry line.

   Another of the DP&S acquisitions was the Bridge Operating Company, which began operated the Williamsburg Bridge "Bridge Local" trolley in March 1922. This line
was City operated, as opposed to the previously mentioned lines which were privately owned.

   The fare to cross the bridge was 1 2/3 cents, or three tickets for a nickel. How the tokens factored into this, it is not certain.

   A proposal for a 3 cent one way fare / 5 cent round trip fare was put forth by a competitor, but a tentative 2 cent fare was instituted by the Department of Plants & Structures on November 25, 1929 for one year.
   In 1930 the fare was 6 cents, and lowered to 5 cents in 1931. The fare appears to have been lowered back to 2 cents, only to be raised to 3 cents on May 19, 1932



March 1922 -1948?

16mm, copper nickel, star punch out at center
signature of Lincoln C. Andrews, receiver
Atwood-Coffee NY630AE

common; $10.00
note: token shown 200% of actual size


Fare Receipt 1 2/3c - Three Rides for 5c
City of New York - Department of Plant & Structures
Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Line
Grover A. Whalen, Commissioner (1923 - )
M. B. Brown Printing & Binding
2" x 1"

Brooklyn Heights RR
1896 to 1923
Brooklyn Heights Railroad
Good for Passage over Williamsburgh Bridge
On Local Bridge Cars Only
C. D. Meneely, Treasurer
2" x 1"
Brooklyn Heights Railroad
Good for Passage over Williamsburgh Bridge
On Local Bridge Cars Only
C. D. Meneely, Treasurer
2" x 1"
Brooklyn Heights Railroad
Good for Passage over Williamsburgh Bridge
On Local Bridge Cars Only
C. D. Meneely, Treasurer
2" x 1"
.scarce; $25.00 to $50.00
.
.
Williamsburg Bridge Tickets, First Unification

Board of Transportation
Brooklyn Manhattan Transit Division - Surface Lines
1940 - 1953
3 15/16" x 1 3/16"

all Manhattan & Williamsburg Bridge tickets,

uncommon; $15.00 to $20.00

   The Williamsburg Bridge trolley was replaced by bus on December 5, 1948, and the bus route was designated B39; and became part of the City of New York Board of Transportation.

Queensboro Bridge "Bridge Local" Tickets & Tokens
November 21, 1909 - April 7, 1957

   
   The Queensboro Bridge Railway, was a franchise operated by the South Shore Traction Company. The fare when opened, was three cents one way or five cents round trip. In the first 11 months of operation, this line carried 1,678,576 passengers.

   The track configuration of the Queensboro Bridge trolley had two unique facets. The first being the track layout was not of the conventional dog bone arrangement allowing endless circling of the cars, and of which could be operated from a single end throughout the entire day. The Queensboro layout, was it had a conventional half a dog bone at the Manhattan end consisting of several loop tracks.

   But the Queens terminal ended into dead end stub track, where a trolley would pull in and the operator would have to change ends. This obviously required he energized trolley pole (which were always trailing in relation to the direction of car travel) to be pulled down and locked; and the pole on the former head end released up into contact with the trolley wire. Now the trolley would be ready to return to service and putt out on the westbound bridge track.

   The second interesting facet of the Queensboro Bridge Trolley, is while the Brooklyn, Manhattan and Williamsburg Bridges only had terminals at either end of the bridge; the Queensboro Bridge was unique in the fact that the trolley line had not one, but two stops upon the bridge span to provide service to both Welfare Island and to Vernon Boulevard at ground level.

   At the stop for Welfare Island
(which was renamed Roosevelt Island in 1973), walkways under the bridge deck connected the the east and westbound trolley stations, and led to the top floor of the nine story Welfare Island Storehouse so that passengers could access elevators to ground level and thereby access to the hospitals located on the island.

   There was also a roadway connecting the bridges automobile deck to the roof of the Storehouse, where an automobile sized freight elevator in the Storehouse allowed automobiles and ambulances to lower to ground level, and access the various hospitals and asylums located upon the island. 

   A helix loop for automobiles was constructed next to the storehouse at this location as well, that permitted access to the island below. This vehicle loop would be closed and subsequently razed upon the opening of the Roosevelt Island Lift Bridge 6/10 of a mile north at 36th Avenue, Ravenswood, Queens.

   However, the passenger elevators would remain in service from the Bridge pedestrian walkways until 1973; some sixteen years after the Queensboro Trolley ceased operation on April 7, 1957.

   The Vernon Avenue stop upon the bridge, had walkways leading to a pair of elevators, one within each leg of the tower. By 1950's, only the elevator in the south leg (Queens Plaza South) was in service until 1973,  but of this I am not sure.

   Was is certain is, both elevators are no longer in service.

Welfare Island Storehouse & Auto Helix

  Also of historical note, is the Queensboro Bridge trolley line was the very last trolley line to operate in the City of New York with service ending April 7, 1957.

   Brooklyn trolley / streetcar operations ended before this date on October 31, 1956.

   Unfortunately, at this time, we are not aware of any paper issues for the Queensboro Bridge trolley. 

   Research conducted of both the New York Times article archives and period documents in Google Books fail to state any reference of or the mention of tickets or tokens used upon trolley service commencing. 

  However, the use of tokens is confirmed in latter era of operations. So, in keeping with the continuity of this chapter, they will be shown here (as well as listed on Page 2 - Tokens of this website)

Queensboro Bridge Railway

   These tokens were known to have been issued for the Bridge Local trolley, which used the outer lanes on the bottom deck of the bridge. An underground loop-track terminal on Second Avenue (Manhattan) to a loop track in Queens Plaza.

   Tokens were used for discounted fares for employees of and volunteers at Coler - Goldwater Memorial Hospital on Welfare Island.
1944 - 10 cent token

23mm,
steel, bar center
Atwood-Coffee NY631O

common; $7.00

1945 - 6¼ cent token
for Hospital Employees


23mm, brass, bar center
Atwood-Coffee 
NY631P

common; $6.00

1947 - 10 cent token

23mm,
copper nickel, bar center
Atwood-Coffee 
NY631Q

five varieties: 631Qa, 631Qb, 631Qc, 631Qd,
631Qe,

extremely common; $4.00

   On April 8, 1957; bus service replaced trolley service and the following tokens issued. This brass 16mm token was sold to employees and volunteers at the Coler - Goldwater Memorial Hospital at the rate of 24 tokens for $1.50 which equated to 6¼¢ per token.
1970 - 6¼ cent token
for Hospital Employees


16mm, brass, ball center
Atwood-Coffee 
NY631T

common; $5.00
note: all tokens shown 200% of actual size

 Steinway Transit

   This next issue of token were sold at the Hospitals on Roosevelt Island at a half fare discount. They were valid for use only on the Steinway Transit route serving Welfare Island, which was the Q102 route, and replaced the 16mm brass employees token issued by Queensboro Bridge Railway.. 

   Steinway Transit descended from Steinway Omnibus, which in turn descended from Steinway Railway. In 1938, the Queensboro Bridge Railway purchased Steinway Railway and organized "Steinway Omnibus" as a subsidiary to operate tohse lines as they were converted from electric streetcars to internal combustion powered buses.

1976

16mm, white metal, S
Atwood-Coffee 
NY631W
two varieties: 631Wa, 631Wb

common; $4.00
note: token shown 200% of actual size




   



First Unification Tickets
- City of New York - Board of Transportation - New York City Transit System

1940 - 1953


 BMT Division (Surface)
Children's Three Cent Ticket

April 1946

scarce; about $25.00 - $40.00

.
notched corners, red prefix letter - with "not valid after" date on back
2" x 1"

uncommon, $10.00 - $15.00
square corners, black prefix letter - without not valid date on back
many single and double letter prefix letters seen
2" x 1"


common, individuals $3.00 to $7.00; strips of tickets: 10% premium
.

strip of 5 Tickets
.

.

   In 1950, the fare for the transit system rose to 10 cents. These 10 cent denomination tickets are somewhat rarer, as these were only used for three years: 1950 through 1953.

.....
A prefix
square corners, black prefix letter, red tint
2" x 1"
BTA-G891-1MM-7-49
B prefix - 7/1949
square corners, black prefix letter (unnumbered), red tint
2" x 1"
.
BTA-G446-3MM-6-50
B prefix - 6/1950
(also seen with BTA G446-1000M - Jan.'52)
square corners, black prefix letter, no tint
2" x 1"
BTA-G446-1000M-JAN, '52
D prefix - January 1952
square corners, red prefix letter printed with serial number, no tint
2" x 1"

uncommon; $10.00 - $15.00

.

.

First Unification; Vending & Advertising Employees Tickets
back not known
BTA-G432-100M-May-'51
Courtesy ticket to allow employees of ABC Vending to enter the
IND Division Subway & Elevated to service the gum vending machines
(Chicklets or Beeman's anyone?) and the "weigh yourself scales".
X prefix
BTA-R368-150M-Feb.'42
Courtesy ticket to allow employees of New York State Advertising to enter the IRT Division Subway & Elevated (presumably to post and change the various advertisments mounted on station walls and in the subway cars.)
XX prefix
.
intentionally left blank
TAA-G432-200M-May '56
Courtesy ticket to allow employees of ABC Vending to enter the
IND Division Subway & Elevated to service the gum vending machines
(Chicklets or Beeman's anyone?) and the "weigh yourself scales".
X prefix
scarce, $20.00 - $25.00

.

.

First Unification Tickets with unknown purpose

square corners, no prefix letter, no tint
for surface lines & routes
2" x 1"

uncommon, $15.00 - $20.00


  

Second Unification Tickets - New York City Transit Authority
1953 to present

    This next ticket were issued under the auspices of the New York City Transit Authority. Its exact purpose is not known, as tokens were already in circulation, but obviously it was for general fare acceptance.

Second Unification Tickets with unknown purpose

TAA-G446-1MM 6-56
June 1956
2" x 1"

rare; $35.00 - $50.00

   

   



(one thing I've always found peculiar was the old plural spelling of employee's: employe's!)


Manhattan Railway (as its own entity) - Elevated Division
1879 - 1903
intentionally left blank
.
.


New York & Sea Beach Railway
1883 - 1896
intentionally left blank
1885
Employee's Monthly Pass - 1889
Brooklyn Heights Railroad
1896 - 1907
.....
.
.
Interborough Rapid Transit
1903 - 1940
.
.
Independent System
1932 - 1940
.
.
Brooklyn Manhattan Transit
1923 - 1940

Railroad Passes in general are highly collectible, not only by transit collectors but from general railroad collectors as well.

You can expect to pay $25.00 and up per pass for mid 20th century issues and $50.00 and up per pass or more, for turn of century passes. For pre-1900 passes, add another 25-50%.
.

.
Brooklyn Rapid Transit (Rapid and Surface)
Employe's Ticket
Void after December 31, 1905
2" x 1"
.
Employe's Ticket
Void after December 31, 1906
2" x 1"
Employe's Ticket
Void after December 31, 1923
2" x 1"
.
Brooklyn Bus, Brooklyn & Queens Transit, New York Rapid Transit & South Brooklyn Railway (Rapid and Surface)
Void after December 31, 1930
2" x 1"
Void after December 31, 1932
2" x 1"
uncommon; $12.00 to $17.00


Steinway Railways
(owned by New York and Queens County)
.....
uncommon, but several are known
$15.00 - $20.00

New York Omnibus Corp.

   The New York City Omnibus operated bus services in New York City between 1926 and 1962. It expanded in 1935 and 1936 with new bus routes to replace the New York Railways Corporation streetcars when these were dismantled. It further expanded with the acquisition of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company in 1954 for a total of 20 routes. NYCO was renamed the Fifth Avenue Coach Lines, Inc. in 1956; filed for bankruptcy in 1962, after which operations were taken over by the Manhattan and Bronx Surface Transit Operating Authority (MaBSTOA).

.
Quarterly format
.
Bi-annual format
.....

   One of the benefits of being the spouse of a railroad employee, was being eligible for free travel. Obviously, the New York City Ominbus Corp thought it appropriate to continue this privilege.

Wives Passes

Quarterly format
.....
.
Bi-annual format
....

These New York City Omnibus passes above are known as samples from Rand McNally.

Many years and varieties are known. Most are seen with damage in upper right corner of reverse, presumably from being detached from a salesmen's catalog or portfolio.
$6.00 - $7.50 each

.

New York City Transit Authority


3 1/4" x 2 5/16"

NYCTA Employees Passes are extremely rare as the NYCTA withhold $50.00 for each month remaining on the validity of the pass.
This pass has a magnetic strip but is not quite yet a MetroCard.
.

.


you are on Page 1: Fare Tickets & Employee PassesPage 7: Half Fare Tickets - Sundays / Weekends
Page 2: TokensPage 8: Half Fare Tickets - Senior Citizens & Handicapped
Page 3: Continuing Ride Tickets & Transfers - Rapid TransitPage 9: School / Student / Pupil Reduced Fare & Free Passes
Page 4: Continuing Ride Tickets & Transfers - Surface; Streetcar LinesPage 10: Special Issue Tickets
Page 5: Continuing Ride Tickets & Transfers - Surface; Bus RoutesPage 11: Staten Island Rapid Transit
Page 6: Continuing Ride Tickets; Surface; Add-A-RidePage 12: Hudson and Manhattan & Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH)

.

 © 2021 - Brighton Beach Express
 Philip M. Goldstein / George S. Cuhaj
 For reuse, additions or corrections,
 please contact:
brghtnbchexp@aol.com

All content, graphics, and text in part or in whole, unless otherwise noted


This website and its authors are not affiliated, employed nor represent the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New York City Transit Authority, The Transit Museum, the City of New York, the State of New York or any other municipal governmental agency; or any private company contracted by the previous agencies; and no such affiliation is implied or suggested.

.