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List of Very Short North American Railroads

When I was about 15 years old, it occurred to me that the longest model railroad main line would likely be very short in prototype size. An HO scale mile is about 60 feet, so a 600 foot main line -- very long for a home layout, even in the US -- would be only about 10 scale miles long. This led to a curiosity about prototype railroads whose main lines would be short enough to model in their full length.

I began to look in various places, such as the copies of Poor's Manual of Railroads in the public library, for information on such very short railroads. I made handwritten notes at the time, supplemented later by other information I found in my college library and other reference sources. After a while, this interest waned.

It rekindled when I visited the former Youngstown and Northern facilities in McDonald, Ohio, as part of the Erie Lackawanna Historical Society's 2003 annual meeting. The Youngstown and Northern, 4.80 miles long, served steel mills in the Youngstown area, and was in fact a US Steel railroad like the Bessemer and Lake Erie or the Duluth, Missabe, and Iron Range. As I looked for more information on the Youngstown and Northern, I remembered the appeal that such very short lines once had for me, and I decided to revive the long-dormant work I had been doing on my list of very short railroads. Sites like the late Carl Arendt's Micro Layout Design Gallery and Emrys Hopkins's LayoutDesigns.com show track plans for very small layouts, but they don't fully cover the range of possible prototypes and other inspiration available, especially in North America. (Carl e-mailed me that I didn't pay enough attention to prototypes like the Monongahela Connecting Railroad that he featured on his site, and I recognize that he had plans based on several such lines. But he also showed layouts at the North Pole or on the moon.)

The point of this list is to serve as inspiration and a starting point for people who would like to look to the real world for small railroads with character. The examples here show a wide variety of locations, types of business, and rosters, though there is a bias toward "critter" type, very small diesel and gasoline locomotives or standard railroad switchers. Some railroads serve a single industry (and there is a surprising number of steel-related railroads), while others are general-traffic short lines.

My criteria for including a railroad on this list are:

This list is not exhaustive. I've made a start, but I'm sure there are many omissions and some errors in what's included here. If you have information you can contribute to making this list more accurate and complete, please e-mail me at johnbruce3(at)att.net (replace the "(at)" with an at-sign). Any information on web sites, articles in the railroad or model railroad press, or books that would make the entries more complete will be most welcome.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to George Elwood of the Fallen Flags Railroad Photos site for permission to use some of his photos here.

Help has started to come in from visitors: I would like to express my thanks to Roger Aponte, Frank Barry, Craig Berndt, Jack Bridge, Trent Dowler, Ed Vasser, Randall Gustafson, Roger Hensley, Tim Locke, Tom Matoff, Harold Reeve, Len Turner, and Linda Miller Wilson.

General References

Plymouth Diesels

The List

Alameda Belt Line

3.5 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 3. Connects with Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe, Southern Pacific, and Western Pacific at Alameda, CA. (July 1968 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had three Alco S1s numbered D1-D3 and two Alco S2s numbered D4 and D5. The line was featured in the April, 1980 Model Railroader in an article that included a drawing of its enginehouse.

Alamo Gulf Coast

4.5 miles of former SP trackage near San Antonio, TX. Web site.

Angelina & Neches River Railroad Co.

9 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. Connects with St. Louis Southwestern at Keltys and Lufkin, TX; Southern Pacific at Dunagan and Lufkin, TX; and Texas South Eastern at Lufkin, TX. Web Site (very complete). Another web site.

Freight Equipment (July 1968 ORER)

XM	Box, Steel, Stagg. Doors	201 to 206		6
	Pulpwood						10
	Coal							9
	Caboose							2
According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line operated one Alco S-2 number 11 and one Alco S-4 number 12. Later acquisitions listed in the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition) include an EMD SW1500 numbered 1500 and an EMD GP38-2 numbered 2000. As of 2007, the line is still in operation. With the very similar Moscow, Camden, and San Augustine, the A&NR was a late operator of steam. Number 208, a Baldwin 2-6-0 of 1912, was not retired until 1964.


Angelina & Neches River GP38-2 2000 on caboose hop. Len Turner photo, used with permission.

Angelina & Neches River caboose 16. Len Turner photo, used with permission.

Appalachian Railway Company

10 miles. Connected with Southern Railway at Eta, NC. Equipment (January 1928 ORER): Locomotives, 1; flat, 2; rack, 1; passenger, 1; motor car, 1; caboose, 1.

Appanoose County Community Railroad

10 miles. Centerville, Iowa. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line operates former Burlington and Rock Island track between Centerville and Moulton, IA. It owns two GP7s, numbered 101 and 973.

Aransas Harbor Terminal Ry.

7.6 miles. Locomotives (oil burning) 2. 14 cars. Connects with Texas and New Orleans R.R. at Aransas Pass, TX (January 1928 ORER)

Arkansas Central Railway

1 mile. Hatton, AR. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line performs local switching and is operated by the KCS.

Aroostook Valley Railroad

4 miles. Presque Isle, ME. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns 3 GE 44-tonners, numbered 10, 11, and 21. It is a former interurban line.

Ashland Railway Company

7 miles Ashland, Alabama. Locomotives (coal burning) 1, Gasoline motor cars, 2. (January 1928 ORER)

Ashtabula, Carson & Jefferson Railroad

Exact length unknown. Carson to Jefferson, Ohio. Formed in 1984 from part of an abandoned Conrail branch that had originally been New York Central. Operates both freight and excursion passenger service using two Alco S-2s, 107 and 518; 518 out of service in 2005 and replaced by S-1 7371, nee US Army. Featured in the March 2007 Railpace Newsmagazine.

Atlantic and Western Railway Company

3.38 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. caboose, 1. Connected with Seaboard Coast Line at Jonesboro and Sanford, NC, Southern at Sanford, NC. (July 1968 ORER) Web Site According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a GE 70-ton loco numbered 100 and a Porter 80-ton loco numbered 101.

Augusta Railroad

1 mile. Connected the town of Augusta, AR with the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern. Its major freight was cotton. Begun in 1887 as a horsecar line called the Augusta Tramway and Transfer Company, the railroad purchased a Porter 0-4-0T in 1900 and later two 0-4-4T Forneys. In 1918, the railroad was sold and reorganized as the Augusta Railroad. In 1926, the line purchased 2-6-0 300 from Alco Cooke, a loco that had been built for the Virginia Central but apparently not delivered. Two diesels were subsequently purchased, model unknown. The line was abandoned in 1958, with #300 going on display in Paragould, AR, and subsequently in Michigan. Web Site The line is discussed in Lucius Beebe's Mixed Train Daily, with a photo of one of the Forneys sitting out of service in an engine shed.

Baltimore & Annapolis Railroad

6 miles. Baltimore to Glen Burnie, MD. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD SW9 numbered 87.

Bath and Hammondsport Railroad

9.28 miles Bath, NY. Coach, 1. Combination passenger baggage, 1. (January 1928 ORER). Web Site Another Web Site. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned two GE 44-tonners numbered D-1 and D-3 and one Plymouth JDT numbered D-2. Two Alco S-1s, 4 and 5, were later on the roster. From the second link above,
Initially the line was controlled by local interests. The Erie, which had the only connection to the Bath & Hammondsport, gradually began to aquire its stock. By 1911 the Erie owned the Bath & Hammondsport Railroad outright. It remained under Erie control until 1936, when it returned to private ownership.

Trackage increased by an additional 22 miles in 1976. The Stueben County Industrial Development Agency chose the railroad to service the former Erie Lackawanna line from Bath to Wayland. A connection with Conrail was established at Bath.

By 1993 the Stueben County Industrial Development Agency was again in the picture. In February of that year, the agency aquired all of the railroads assets. They were leased to the Champagne Railroad in March of that year. The Champagne Railroad maintained the dwindling freight bussiness, and operated a popular tourist excursion out of Bath.

The Stueben County Industrial Development Agency became involved once more in the spring of 1996. After the death of its owner, Stanley Clark, the Champagne Railroad ceased operations. The agency reveiewd proposals from three regional short line operators, including Genesee Valley Transportation, Owego & Harford Railway and the Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad. The Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad was selected in March to take over operations.

According to Wikipedia,
These operations were transferred to subsidiary Cohocton Valley Railroad in 2001, and later that year this company was renamed B&H Rail Corporation and assumed a long-term lease of Norfolk Southern Railway trackage between Wayland, Bath and Painted Post. At this time, the LAL embarked on an aggressive track rehab program, replacing many ties. The track to Hammondsport remains out of service, but is not abandoned.

As of August 2008, the B&H sees regular service between Cohocton and Painted Post. About half of a mile of the Hammondsport branch line being used as a siding.

Bauxite & Northern Ry. Co.

3 miles. Bauxite, AR. Locomotives, 2. 1 car. Connections: with Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Ry. at Gibbons, Ark., and Missouri Pacific R.R. at Bauxite Jct., Ark. (January 1928 ORER) From Union Pacific web site, 2003: "BXN operates freight service between Bauxite and a UP connection at Bauxite Jct., AR, three miles. Rail is 115 pound. Traffic includes bauxite, aluminia, clay and cement - about 3,600 cars a year. The company was incorporated November 13, 1906. Construction started during April, 1907 and the road opened a short time later."

According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had one Alco S2 numbered 9, an EMD SW9 numbered 10, an EMD SW1200 numbered 11, two Alco RS-3s numbered 12 and 13, and an Alco RS-2 numbered 14.

On September 9, 2005, the railroad was purchased by holding company RailAmerica from Alcoa.

Bay Point and Clayton Railroad Company

9 miles Bay Point and Clyde, CA. Locomotives, 1. Cars, 2. Connected with ATSF and SP at Bay Point and San Francisco-Sacramento at Clyde. (January 1928 ORER) The line was built to serve Cowell Cement Company facilties. Most of the right of way. and land surrounding the railroad became the upper storage area of the Concord Naval Weapons Station at the start of World War II, while the railroad's main customer, the Cowell cement plant, was ending its operations. The Navy line lasted into the 1990s.

The Bay Terminal Railroad

5.54 miles. Toledo, OH Locomotives (coal burning) 1 In 1928 operated 306 TM type tank cars marked "B.T.R.R.". Conneted with New York Central at East Toledo, OH; Toledo Terminal at Pew, OH, and Wheeling & Lake Erie at Navarre Ave. Jct., OH (January 1928 ORER)

Beaufort and Morehead Railroad Company

3.17 miles. Locomotives (diesel), 3, (diesel-electric), 1, total, 4. Connects with Atlantic and East Carolina at Morehead City, NC. In 1937, the original Norfolk Southern dropped its lease of the Atlantic and North Carolina between Morehead City and Beaufort. The Beaufort & Morehead Railroad operated that segment until 1990, when it was acquired by the North Carolina Railroad Commission. B&M continued its operation until the late 1990's, when the bridge to Beaufort was abandoned. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had the following locos:
8	GE		50 Ton
45	GE		45 Ton
65	Whitcomb	65 Ton
85	Whitcomb	85 Ton

Beech Mountain Railroad

8 miles. Alexander, WV. Hauls coal to a CSX connection at Alexander. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), it operates an Alco S-4 numbered 113.

Belton Railroad Company

7 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 1. Connection with Missouri-Kansas-Texas at Smith, TX. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had one 50 ton Whitcomb numbered 1 and a GE 25-ton loco numbered 2161. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), more recently it operates an EMD SW1 numbered 504.

Freight equipment (July 1968 ORER)

XM	Box, all steel	1
XM	Box, all steel	31263

Benwood & Wheeling Connecting Railway Co.

7.41 miles. Locomotives (coal burning), 9.
Freight equipment

Flat, steel. 100,101
Flat, wood. 205 to 208
Flat, wood. 210
Flat, wood. 99
Gondola, wood. 200 to 204
Gondola, wood. 209,211
Pig iron dump, steel 1 to 10
Scale test

Black Mountain Railway

10.6 miles. Kona, NC. Connected with Clinchfield Railroad at Kona, NC. According to the January, 1928 ORER, owned 1 locomotive. This railroad later became the Yancey Railroad (see below).

Brandywine Valley Railroad

4 miles. Coatesville to Valley Township, PA. It is owned by Lukens Steel. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), it operates 3 EMD NW2s, numbered 8201-8203, two SW1200s, numbered 8204 and 8205, and one SW9, numbered 8206.

Bristol Railroad

6.59 miles. Bristol, VT Locomotives (coal burning) 2; 6 cars (January 1928 ORER) Web Site

Brookings & Peach Orchard R.R.

3-1/2 miles. Locomotives, 1, cars, 4. Connection: With Missouri Pacific R.R. at Moline, Ark. (January 1928 ORER)

BSDA Railroad

1 mile. Switching railroad in St. Louis, MO. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), it operates one EMD SW1200 numbered 1209.

Buffalo Creek Railroad

4.6 miles. Buffalo, NY. The July 1968 ORER listed 40 foot box cars in four series: 1002-1449; 1502-1999; 2000-2499; and 2500-2999. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line owned 2 EMC SWs numbered 40-41; an EMD SW1 numbered 42; an Alco HH-660 numbered 43, and 7 Alco S-2s numbered 44-50.

Burlington Junction Railway

2 miles. Burlington, IA. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), it operates a 44 ton GE numbered 44.

Cadiz Railroad Company

Cadiz to Gracey, KY. Miles of Road Operated: 10.46. Equipment -- Locomotives -- Diesel-electric, 3. Other: flat, 1, caboose, 1, total, 2. (ORER)The Cadiz Railroad was built in 1901 to haul tobacco to Gracey in Christian County, where it connected with the Illinois Central and Louisville & Nashville railroads. By the 1960s, it mostly hauled cross ties from a small sawmill in Cadiz. Then Hoover Ball Bearing located their plant along the line, which dramatically increased carloadings in the 70's and early 80's. When Hoover Ball Bearing closed, the line's fate was sealed. In its later years, the line had incentive per diem boxcars lettered for it. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line operated one GE 45 ton locomotive numbered 7. Two Alco S-1s numbered 8 and 9 later came from the Tennessee Central. According to Ed Vasser, S-3 No. 10 was purchased by the Cadiz Railroad in 1984 from the Fordyce & Princeton Railroad (their #662). After abandonment of the Cadiz, No. 10 was sold in 1989 to the Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad, and became their No. 19. The line was abandoned in 1990.


Cadiz Railroad 10 Princeton, KY May 30, 1989 Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

Camino, Placerville & Lake Tahoe Railroad

8 miles. Camino to Placerville, CA. Wikipedia entry. Roster page. The line was built by the Placerville & Lake Tahoe Railway and opened in 1904. The Camino, Placerville & Lake Tahoe was formed in December 1911 to purchase the defunct Placerville & Lake Tahoe. It was owned by the Michigan-California Lumber Company. It ceased operations on June 17, 1986, when the Southern Pacific abandoned its Placerville branch. Locomotives included Shay number 2 and GE 44-tonners numbered 101 and 102.


Former Camino Placerville & Lake Tahoe Shay 2 Travel Town Los Angeles, CA February 28, 2012.

Canton Railroad

5 miles. Switching line in Baltimore, MD. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), it operates an SW1200 numbered 1200 and an SW1500 numbered 1500.

Cape Fear Railways, Inc

7 miles Skibo and Fort Bragg, NC Locomotives, 1. Gasoline passenger motor cars, 4, trailers, 1. (January 1928 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned what appeared to be Alco MRS-1 locos numbered 6676 and 6679. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), it later owned four Alco MRS-1s.

Carbon County Railway Company

4-1/2 miles. Columbia, UT to Columbia Jct. Connects with Denver and Rio Grande Western (January 1928 ORER) Web Site

This railroad served coal mines connected with the U.S.Steel Geneva Works. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the Carbon County had two SW9s numbered 1201 and 1202.

Carolina Western Railroad

6 miles St. Stephens, SC Locomotives, 2 (January 1928 ORER)

CBEC Railway

According to the Iowa Department of Transportation, "The CBEC Railway was formed in 1992 by the MidAmerican Energy Company in Council Bluffs. The CBEC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of MidAmerican. The headquarters are located in Des Moines. The CBEC owns six miles of track in the Council Bluffs area, which were installed in 1997. The track is primarily used by BNSF Railway and Union Pacific Railroad to haul coal to the utility plant located south of Council Bluffs. Administrative services are provided by MidAmerican Energy. The Great Western Railway performs the maintenance functions. The main product handled by the CBEC is coal."

Central Indiana & Western Railroad

9 miles. Lapel to Anderson, IN. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns an EMD SW-7 numbered 88.


Central Indiana & Western 8307 Roger Hensley Photo, Used by Permission

The Chaffee Railroad Company

3.25 miles Chaffee, WV Locomotives (coal burning) 2; motor car, 1; box, 1; gondola; 1. (January 1928 ORER)

Chalchicomula Railway

The U.S. Department of Commerce 1942 Latin American Transportation Survey of "The Railways of Mexico" lists this line as 6 miles long, linking Chalchicomula with San Andres on the Mexicano's Veracruz mainline (34 employees, 5 locomotives, 7 boxcars, 10 flats, 3 stock cars, 1 gon, 1 oil tank car, 13 passenger cars, 20,354 passengers carried in 1939, 515 carloads of freight in 1939, operating ratio 191.290 in 1939.)

Charles City Rail Line

4 miles. Charles City, IA. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns two ex-ICG GP10s numbered 9086 and 9363.

Chattahoochee Valley Railway Company

Miles of Road Operated: 9.51. West Point, GA to McGinty, AL. Equipment: diesel-electric, 3. Other: caboose, 1. flat, maintenance-of-way, 1. Total, 2. (1974 ORER) Wikipedia entry. Web site. The railroad was built in 1895 from Langdale to Lanett, and was extended to Riverview by 1897. In 1900, the railroad was reorganized to became the Chattahoochee Valley Railway. By 1916 the railroad totaled 45 miles. In 1932 part of the railroad was abandoned from Standing Rock to West Point. In the 1960s, a dam was constructed north of West Point, and the CHV built a short spur line to reach the construction site for delivery of materials. When construction of the dam was completed in 1973 the spur was abandoned. The railroad shut down completely in 1992. The Railroad Magazine rosters list an Alco HH-900 numbered 85 (traded to EMD for SW1500 101) an Alco S2 numbered 100; and an Alco RS-1 numbered 743, ex-Rock Island acquired in 1968. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line later owned an EMD SW1500 numbered 101 and an SW1001 numbered 102.

Chemex Railroad

According to Roger Aponte's site on Puerto Rican railroads, "This is a standard gauge railroad located in the southern port of Ponce. It is the only industrial railroad in Puerto Rico. About twice a month, there is a barge service, carrying about 20 tank cars, between Mobile, Alabama and Ponce, Puerto Rico. It has two diesel locomotives. Operations started around 1988." One of the locomotives appears to be an EMD SW-1.


Chemex Railroad SW-1 Roger Aponte photo, used by permission.

More photos and information are available at Roger's website.

Chestnut Ridge Railway Company

10 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. Miscellaneous, 1. Connects with Central Railroad of New Jersey at Palmerton, PA. (July 1968 ORER) From this site:
The New Jersey Zinc Company in Palmerton maintained plants in two separate locations. The westernmost Palmerton Plant was situated along the CNJ mainline between HD and HX Interlockers while the easternmost East Palmerton Plant was north of the CNJ mainline along Aquashicola Creek. Each plant operated its own railroad on plant property. The New Jersey Zinc Company's wholly-owned Chestnut Ridge Railway transferred cars between plants and interchanged with he CNJ at the Palmerton Plant.
According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line owned two Alco S-2s numbered 10 and 11. I believe these were lettered for the New Jersey Zinc Company. The "miscellaneous" unit was a gas railcar.

Chicago-Chemung Railroad

4 miles. Harvard to Chemung, IL. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD SW7 numbered 202.

Claremont-Concord Railroad

5 miles. Claremont Junction to Claremont, NH. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the road operates two GE 44-ton locomotives, numbered 30 and 119.

Coe Rail

9 miles. Wixom to Walled Lake, MI. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line operates one Alco S-2 numbered 51, one S-1 numbered 70, and one 20-ton Whitcomb numbered 105.

Columbia & Cowlitz Railway Company

8.5 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. Caboose, 1. Connections: Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific, Great Northern, Northern Pacific, and Union Pacific at Rocky Point, WA (July 1968 ORER) The Columbia & Cowlitz listing on the Union Pacific's site. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line operates two MK-rebuilt GP7s numbered 700 and 701.

According to this site,

The Columbia & Cowlitz was incorporated on April 9, 1925, and was built from 1926-1928. While the Weyerhaeuser Woods Railroad serves only Weyerhaeuser facilities, and generally does not interchange equipment with other railroads, the Columbia & Cowlitz interchanges with the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad at Rocky Point, and serves customers such as NORPAC, Solvay Interox & Northwest Freight Car, in addition to Weyerhaeuser's Longview Mill. In addition to a caboose, Columbia & Cowlitz owns 3 locomotives and about 1500 freight cars. The Columbia & Cowlitz only operates 6.5 miles of track from Longview, far enough to access Rocky Point Yard. Technically, the boundary between the two is Ostrander. From there on, the line is solely operated by the Weyerhaeuser Woods Railroad. In addition to having separate equipment, the two railroad operations also have separate groups of employees, even though they share much of the same track.

Conemaugh & Black Lick Railroad

9 miles. Switching road owned by Bethlehem Steel in Johnstown, PA. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line had two Whitcomb 65-ton locomotives numbered 52 and 56; and EMD SW1s numbered 60-65. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), by the 1990s the line operated five EMD NW2s numbered 100-102, 122, and 125; six SW7s numbered 104, 110-112; 114, and 116; and two SW1200s numbered 127 and 128.

Cotton Plant-Fargo Railway Co.

5.6 miles. Locomotives, 1. (July 1968 ORER) According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a Plymouth 0-4-0 loco numbered 1, no other information available. Martin Lofton of Sunshine Models says that this line was organized to retain the cotton plant's rail access following the abandonment of the Missouri & North Arkansas Railroad.


Cotton Plant-Fargo Ry Plymouth 1 at Cotton Plant, AR. George Elwood photo, used by permission.

The Dansville & Mount Morris Railroad Co.

9 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. Connects with Erie Lackawanna at Groveland, NY (July 1968 ORER) According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a GE 44-ton loco numbered 1.

Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad Co.

7 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric, 3; diesel-mech., 1); 4; gondola, 2; total, 2 cars. Dardanelle, AR (July 1968 ORER) Steam locomotives included 4, a 1913 Baldwin 2-6-2; 9, an 1884 Baldwin 2-6-0; and 10, a 1907 Baldwin 2-6-0. 9 is currently preserved at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum at North Freedom, WI. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had one Plymouth model XL numbered 5, a GE 45-tonner numbered 12, an EMC SW numbered 14, and two EMD SW1s numbered 15 and 16. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line later had an EMD SW7 numbered 17, an Alco S-1 numbered 18, and an S-3 numbered 19 (former Cadiz Railroad 10).


Shop at Dardanelle, AR. George Elwood photo, used by permission.

Delta Valley & Southern Railway Co.

2 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 1. Connection with St. Louis-San Francisco at Delpro, AR According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a GE 50 ton diesel numbered 50.

Doniphan, Kensett & Searcy Railway

6 miles. Locomotives, 2. Connects with Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific and Missouri & North Arkansas at Searcy, AR, and Missouri Pacific at Kensett, AR (January 1928 ORER)

Equipment

FM	Flat	59
also 2 locomotives; one coach numbered 1; one baggage numbered 101; one motor bus. The line is discussed in Lucius Beebe's Mixed Train Daily. At the time of his visit, it was operating a Missouri Pacific caboose converted from a boxcar. The following is from a 1912 Interstate Commerce Commission case:
The sawmill of the Doniphan Lumber Company is at Doniphan, Ark., at the northern end of its tap line, known as the Doniphan, Kensett & Searcy, which connects with the Iron Mountain 1-1/2 miles to the south at a point known as Kensett. The lumber company and the tap line are identical in interest, their stock being held by the same individuals. The tap line is also indebted to the lumber company in a sum exceeding $35,000. The track from Doniphan to Kensett was constructed in 1906, when the mill was erected, the steel being leased from the Iron Mountain. Doniphan is a mill town with about 75 houses belonging to the lumber company; and the track from Doniphan to Kensett is used exclusively for the traffic of the lumber company and its employees.

In 1907 about 5 miles of track was constructed from Kensett westward to Searcy, a county seat with a population of about 3,000, where a connection was effected with the Rock Island lines and the Missouri & North Arkansas Railroad. Although this track is used chiefly for the movement of logs for the lumber company, there is some outside traffic over it; and it runs parallel to the line of the Missouri & North Arkansas. It appears that there was formerly a line from Kensett to Searcy operated by mule power, and known as the Merchants Transportation Company, by means of which freight was transferred from the Iron Mountain to the town of Searcy; but this mule line was abandoned when the Doniphan, Kensett & Searcy was opened for operation. The Missouri & North Arkansas was after-wards built in through Searcy to Kensett and beyond, and the tap line enjoys trackage rights over it for a considerable distance north-ward from Searcy to the timber of the Doniphan Lumber Company. Utilizing this trackage right, for which a wheelage charge of $1 per train-mile is apparently paid, the tap line hauls the logs to Searcy, and thence over its own rails through Kensett to the mill at Doniphan. For this movement it charges the lumber company 2 cents per 100 pounds. When the lumber is shipped out the tap line switches the cars to the Iron Mountain at Kensett, a distance of 1-1/2 miles, or removes them 6 miles to Searcy, where they are de-livered to the Rock Island. In either case it receives a division of 3 or 4 cents per 100 pounds out of the joint rates. It also participates in through class rates to certain destinations, including Memphis and St. Louis, out of which it is allowed by the trunk lines 20 per cent or 25 per cent as a division. It does not carry passengers. More than 85 per cent of the whole traffic of the tap line for the fiscal year 1910 was supplied by the lumber company. While the country through which the tap line passes has largely been cleared of timber, the forest of the lumber company being located along the Missouri & North Arkansas as heretofore stated, the agricultural products handled by the tap line for the year 1910 aggregated only 662 tons.

The equipment of the tap line consists of 2 locomotives, 21 flat cars, and 2 cabooses, all having safety appliances. The lumber company has neither rolling stock nor unincorporated logging spurs, at least in the vicinity of the tap line. The employees of the tap line include two train crews, one section gang, two station agents, and two general officers. The officers and the agent at Doniphan are jointly employed by the tap line and the lumber company. Through bills of lading and through waybills for the movement of lumber are issued by the agent of the tap line at Doniphan. While apparently no dividends have been paid, there was a surplus on June 30, 1910, of $14,265.14, indicating that the operation of the tap line under its allowances has been a profitable one.

For its service in switching to or from the mill, a distance of 11 miles, to the Iron Mountain at Kensett, the latter may allow this tap line a switching charge of $2.50 a car; for its service in switching the products of the controlling mill through Kensett, a distance of 6 miles, to the Rock Island at Searcy, the latter may allow the Doniphan, Kensett & Searcy a division out of the rate of 1 cent per 100 pounds.

As of 2007, the line is still in existence, connecting with the Union Pacific.

Depew, Lancaster & Western Railroad

5 miles. Depew to Lancaster, NY. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), this line owns three Alco RS-11s numbered 3600, 3603, and 3604; one RS-3 numbered 4085; and one S-4 numbered 9085.

Dunn-Erwin Railway

6 miles. Dunn to Erwin, NC. Operates as a division of the Aberdeen & Rockfish. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD NW2 numbered 5072.

East Jersey Railroad and Terminal Company

2 miles. Terminal road at Bayonne, NJ. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line operates one GE 65-ton locomotive numbered 18 and one 80-ton locomotive numbered 19.

East Portland Traction Company

7 miles. Switching road between East Portland and Milwaukie, OR. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD SW1 numbered 100; a GE 25-ton numbered 25; and a 70-ton numbered 5100.

East Texas and Gulf Railway Co.

9.60 miles. Connects with Texas and New Orleans at Hyatt, TX. Locomotives, 3. (January 1928 ORER)

Edgemoor and Manetta

2.5 miles, connecting with Seaboard Air Line at Edgemoor, SC (January 1928 ORER)

This line was covered in an article by Jim Boyd in the March, 1972 Railroad Model Craftsman. At that time the railroad was operating with an 0-4-0T number 5, which it had acquired in 1941. An additional flat car number 400 was on the property. Link to a pdf of a very complete article.

Effingham Railroad

2 miles. Effingham, IL. Connects with CN (ex-ICG) and CSX (ex-Conrail). Begun in 1996 to serve an industrial park. Trains Magazine article.

Effingham Railroad 2716 Effingham, IL November 15, 2011. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

El Dorado & Wesson Railway

6 miles. El Dorado to Wesson, AR. Wikipedia entry. The El Dorado & Wesson was covered in a well-known ICC decision called the Tap Line Case, which contains a good deal of information on its early history:
In 1904 the Edgar Lumber Company purchased a small mill at Wesson, Ark., which delivered its manufactured product to the Arkansas Southern Railroad, a subsidiary line of the Rock Island system, by means of a branch or spur track about 5 miles in length, owned by the Arkansas Southern but operated by the lumber company. This track joined the Arkansas Southern at a point known as Cornie Junction and was built of steel weighing only 20 and 30 pounds to the yard, the individual rails being from 6 inches to 30 feet in length. The capacity of the mill was increased, and its owners incorporated the El Dorado & Wesson Railway Company and built a track from the mill northward for about 10 miles to El Dorado, where a connection is had with the Rock Island and the Iron Mountain. . . . The equipment of the tap line consists of 1 locomotive, 1 passenger coach, 1 baggage car, 4 box and 3 flat cars. It runs one mixed train daily in each direction, on which passengers and the mail are carried. The revenue from its passenger service for the fiscal year 1910, as reported to the Commission, was $5,523.67, and a slightly less amount for the year 1911. Its total traffic for the year 1910 was 40,487 tons and its revenue thereon $37,608.28, as reported to the Commission. Of this tonnage 36,433 tons is stated of record as the weight of the lumber forwarded by the Edgar Lumber Company. The traffic in farm products and supplies for settlers is small, although the country through which it runs is said to have been occupied as a farming community before the Civil War. El Dorado, the junction point with the trunk lines, is the county seat and has a population of 7,000. Wesson is apparently a mill town with about 800 inhabitants. There is a small cotton gin at Wesson and three or four merchants.
EDW traffic currently consists of petroleum products, chemicals, and medium density fiberboard. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns five Alco S-2s numbered 20-24; and two EMD SW7s numbered 25 and 26.

El Dorado & Wesson 20 pushes its train from Newell back to El Dorado past "E&W Oil Well #1." Paul Strang photo, used with permission.

Elwood, Anderson & Lapelle RR Co

3 miles Elwood, IN Locomotives, 2. cars, 6. (January 1928 ORER)

Etna & Montrose Railroad Co

1.03 miles Etna and Sharpsburg, Pa. Locomotives, 5. Freight cars owned or leased: none. Connected with B&O at Etna, Pa and PRR at Sharpsburg, Pa.

Ferdinand Railroad

7.38 miles Ferdinand to Huntingburg, IN. Connected with Southern Railway at Huntingburg. January, 1928 ORER listed Locomotives, 1; combination, 1; gasoline passenger car, 1. Photo of steam loco last run, Huntingburg, IN, 1952. "The passenger car, #305, was built as an interurban trailer and was purchased in 1939. The steam engine, #9, was purchased from the LNA&C in 1951. Both were scrapped in 1953." The line is discussed in Lucius Beebe's Mixed Train Daily. Partial photos of a different steam loco and a combination car are shown. Ed Vasser and Craig Berndt provide the following information: The FRDN owned a GE 45 ton No. 101 (Built 2/53 number 31715). From 1966 to 1980, Ferdinand Railroad was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dolly Madison Industries (1977, name changed to DMI). From 1980 to 1987, Ferdinand Railroad was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Evans Transportation, whose railcar lease fleet at one point included more than 1,000 freight cars with the FRDN reporting mark. Evans Transportation also owned and operated the Louisville New Albany & Corydon (LNAC). From 1987 to 1990, the line was acquired by and name changed to Ferdinand & Huntingburg Railroad Co. (FRDN, FHRR), a subsidiary of Itel Rail. Another Itel Rail subsidiary owned and operated the LNA&C. In 1988, Itel Rail transferred the LNAC reporting mark to the Ferdinand & Huntingburg (FRDN, FHRR, LNAC) and sold LNA&C to BPM Rail (LNAL). In 1988, the Ferdinand Railroad Co. and the Louisville, New Albany & Corydon Railroad Co. were dissolved. In 1990-1991, the line was sold to and name changed to Ferdinand Corporation, which operated the line as the Ferdinand Railroad in name only. July 9, 1991, Ferdinand 45-ton no. 101 and LNA&C boxcar no. 3983 arrived in Southern’s Huntingburg yards with the last freight out of Ferdinand. No. 101 was delivered to Corydon for use on the former LNA&C. July 26, 1991 was the effective date of Ferdinand Corporation abandonment. Today, you can find practically no traces of the line.

Flemingsburg & Northern R.R. Company

6 miles. Flemingsburg, KY Locomotives, 1; 3 cars. Connects with Louisville and Nashville at Flemingsburg Jct., KY (January 1928 ORER)

Fore River Railway

3 miles. East Braintree to Quincy, MA. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one Alco S-6 numbered 17 and one Alco S-4 numbered 18.

Georgetown Railroad Company

7.9 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 3. Georgetown, TX (July 1968 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned three Baldwin VO1000 locos numbered 1002-1004 and one Baldwin S12 numbered 1005. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), there was later an SW1500 numbered 1010.

Golden Triangle Railroad

9 miles. Columbus to Trinity, MS. The line was built in 1981 and 1982 to serve a Weyerhaeuser paper mill. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD MP15AC and two GP38-2s numbered 810 and 819.

Greenville & Northern Railway

10 miles. Greenville to Travelers Rest, SC. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns two GE 70-ton locomotives numbered 70 and 75.

Hannibal Connecting Railroad

3 miles. Hannibal and Ilasco, MO. Web Site

Hardin Southern Railroad

See J&J Railroad.

Hartwell Railroad

10 miles. Hartwell to Bowersville, GA. The Hartwell Railroad was completed from Hartwell to Bowersville in 1879 as a 3-foot gauge line. In 1898, it was reorganized as the Hartwell Railway. The Southern Railway took control in 1902 and widened the gauge to standard in 1905. In 1924, the Southern sold the line to local businessmen. In 1995, the line was reorganized again as the Hartwell Railroad. Web site. Locomotives have included a GE 44-ton numbered 2 and a 65-ton numbered 4. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), this line owns one EMD SW1 numbered 7.

Hickory Valley Railroad

3 miles. Endeavor, Pa. Locomotives, 1. Freight cars, none. Connection with Pennsylvania R.R. at W. Hickory, PA. (January 1928 ORER) Web Site.

Hutchinson & Northern Railway

6 miles. Switching road in Hutchinson, KS. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line operates one Alco S-1 numbered 5 and two EMD SW900s numbered 6 and 7.

Illini Terminal Railroad

1.5 miles. Litchfield, IL. Operated by Respondex Rail and serves a single industry in an industrial park in Litchfield. It operates a GP9 numbered 1604 and painted in green and yellow Illinois Terminal colors.

Illini Terminal 1604 Litchfield, IL November 15, 2011. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

Illinois Northern Railway

The July 1960 ORER lists this railroad as being 19 miles long, but this Surface Transportation Board document suggests the actual route miles were 2.38. It was "a switching carrier owned by International Harvester (IH). IH sold its capital stock in the INR to a group of railroads, one of which was The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company (ATSF). Later, ATSF (now BNSF) acquired all of the former INR interests in the Chicago area." The line ran from near the Santa Fe's Corwith Yard to industries in the Western Avenue area of Chicago. According to the July 1960 ORER, the line had two gondolas numbered 900 and 907; one flat car numbered 700; three cabooses numbered 101 to 103; one sand car numbered 500; and one tool car numbered 600. The cars were not used in interchange service. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line owned six Alco S-4s numbered 29-34.

Proto 2000 Mather box car lettered for Illinois Northern.

Indian Creek Railroad

4 miles. Florida Station to Frankton, IN. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one Alco RS-11 numbered 6002. The line was started in 1981 by the Rydman & Fox Company to serve their grain elevator in Anderson, IN. According to their web site, "Acquired in 1982, the #6002 is an ex-Southern Paciic Alco RS11 built in 1959 and rebuilt in 1996. The well maintained RS11 earns its keep filling hoppers, making up grain trains to be picked up at Florida Station on Norfolk Southern's Indian Creek Secondary, and bringing fertilizer cars back up the hill to the bulk storage facilitiy."

Indian Creek Railroad 6002 Frankton, IN October 2009. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

Iowa Traction Railroad

9 miles. Mason City to Clear Lake, IA. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns four 50-ton electric locomotives numbered 50, 51, 53, and 54; and one 60-ton electric locomotive numbered 60.

The Ironton Railroad Company

8.34 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 1. Connects with Central R.R. of New Jersey at Hokendaqua, PA; Lehigh Valley and Reading Co. at Catasauqua, PA. (July 1968 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned two Baldwin DS-4-4-1000 switchers numbered 750 and 751.

J&J Railroad

8 miles. Hardin to Murray, KY. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned one EMD SW1 numbered 1. Ed Vasser provides the following information:
The J&J Railroad operated irregular freight service from Hardin to Murray, KY, 8.34 miles, where it connected with the KWT Railroad. Traffic was inbound agricultural products and outbound grain. The line was former L&N trackage which was purchased from the Seaboard System in July 1983. The company was owned by J. Dunagin - Hardin Grain Elevator, Inc. and the "J & J" were the initials of the owner's two grandchildren.

The Hardin Southern acquired the assets of the J&J Railroad in October 1983 and operated limited excursion trains along with the irregular freight service. The EMD SW-1 was included in the sale and repainted/re-numbered to it's original Milwaukee Road number of 863.

I don't have the exact date in front of me right now, but the Hardin Southern was abandoned within the past couple of years [as of 2012] after the grain elevator in Hardin went out of business and they could not get funding to continue to operate the line.


JJRD 1 - EMD SW-1 - Hardin, KY, August 1992. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.


HSRR 863 - EMD SW-1 (Former JJRD 1) - Hardin, KY, June 15, 1994. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

Jaxport Terminal Railway

See also Municipal Docks Railway of the Jacksonville Port Authority. 8 miles. Switching line in Jacksonville, FL. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD SW7 numbered 252 and one GP18 numbered 1056.

Kane and Elk Railroad Company

8 miles. Locomotives (coal burning), 1. Connects with Pennsylvania Railroad at East Kane, PA.

Equipment (January 1928 ORER)

XM	Box		301`
FM	Flat		121 to 125
FM	Flat		127, 155
GA	Gondola	201

Kelly's Creek & Northwestern Railroad

7 miles. Cedar Grove to Lewis, WV. Web site. The line was started in 1902 by the Valley Camp Coal Company. It managed to stay in business until April 1993 when Quaker State sold its holdings in Valley Camp Coal. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned two EMD MP15DCs numbered 1 and 2, which went to the Alaska Railroad, and a GE 70-ton locomotive numbered 7.

Kendallville Terminal Railway Co.

1.1 miles. Kendallville, IN. Operates track serving the Kraft Marshmallow Plant. KTR is a Pioneer Rail Corp operation. Kendallville Terminal's only locomotive is No. 16, an EMD SW-8, which came from the Ludington Northern Railroad (LUN).

Kendallville Terminal Railway 16 Kendallville, IN May 2006. Ed Vasser photo, used with permission.

Klamath Northern Railway

10.6 miles. Gilchrist to Gilchrist Junction, CA. Connects with Southern Pacific's (now Union Pacific) Natron Cutoff. Constructed in 1938 by Gilchrist Lumber Company, incorporated as common carrier in 1940. Ceased to be a common carrier (but still in operation) when Gilchrist Lumber was acquired by Crown Pacific Ltd. Web site. Locomotive Roster and Photos.

Knox Railroad Company

8 miles Union, ME Connects with Maine Central at Warren, ME Locomotives, 2, freight, 1, Combination Passenger and Baggage, 1. (January 1928 ORER)

Lake Champlain and Moriah Railroad Company

7 miles Port Henry, NY. Locomotives 7 77 freight cars (January 1928 ORER)

The Lake Terminal Railroad Company

4.78 miles. Locomotives (diesel), 14. (July 1968 ORER) Lorain, Ohio. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned five EMD SW8s numbered 821-825, 20 EMD NW2s numbered 1001-1020, and one EMD SW1001 numbered 1021.

Freight equipment (July 1968)

GB	Gond, Stl sides, fixed ends, Flat bot., stl. flr	2000-2199
GB	Gond, Stl sides, fixed ends, Flat bot., stl. flr	2500-2549
GB	Gond, Stl sides, fixed ends, Flat bot., stl. flr	4000-4099
GB	Gond, Stl sides, fixed ends, Flat bot., wood  flr	5000-5022
GB	Gond, Stl sides, fixed ends, Flat bot., wood  flr	6000-6046
GB	Gond, Stl sides, fixed ends, Flat bot., wood  flr	19082-19978

Lapeer Industrial Railroad

1.34 miles, plus 0.88 miles leased from GTW. Lapeer, MI. Web site.

Landisville Railroad

3 miles. Landisville to Silver Spring, PA. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one GE 44-ton locomotive numbered 8526 and one EMD SW900m numbered 8651.

L'Anguille River Railway Company

2 miles Marianna, AR Connects with Missouri Pacific at Marianna, AR (January 1928 ORER) I have the following e-mail (quoted with permission):
Hello, I have in hand an original stock certificate for the L'Anguille River Railway Company. It is signed February 14, 1917, and is issued to my grandfather Max D. Miller who owned the railroad. The railroad was used to move lumber from his mill in Marianna, Lee County, Arkansas, to the Missouri Pacific line for transportation out of the area. The certificate is for 48 shares. I do not know how many shares were issued, but I might be able to find out if you are interested. My grandfather is listed as the president of the company. There was a large saw mill on the banks of the L'Anguille in Marianna that once employed more people than anyone in the area. I was raised there, but the railroad was long gone before I was born. Linda Miller Wilson

Lee County Central

While I haven't found this line in the ORER or Official Guide, Jim Boyd had an article on this line in the February 2004 Railroad Model Craftsman. The line began in 1910 as a country trolley line, and purchased its first small steam loco in 1911 for freight service. In 1929, the line purchased the first of a series of 4-wheel internal combustion switchers. It ceased operation in 1972.

Lewisburg & Buffalo Creek

2 miles. Winfield to West Milton, PA. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD SW8 numbered 1500 and one SW1 numbered 9425.

Little Kanawha River Railroad

3 miles. Switching line at South Parkersburg, WV. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one EMD SW1200 numbered 1205.

Little Rock Port Railway

10 miles. Switching line at Little Rock, AR. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one Alco S-2 numbered 1032.

Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad

10 miles. Avon to Lakeville, NY. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned one Alco RS-1 numbered 20; one Alco S-2 numbered 72; and one Alco C-425 numbered 425. Wikipedia entry.

Longview, Portland & Northern Railway

Gardner Junction to Gardner, OR. 4 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns one Alco S2 numbered 111 and one EMD SW1500 numbered 130. Wikipedia entry. The Gardner line was built in 1952 and closed in 1999.

Lowville & Beaver River Railroad

Lowville to Croghan, NY. 10 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned 2 GE 44-ton locomotives numbered 1947 and 1950. The line has been out of service since the mid-1990s. Wikipedia entry.

Louisville, New Albany & Corydon Railroad

Corydon Junction to Corydon, IN. 8 miles. The line was opened in 1883 between Corydon and Corydon Jct, It was dieselized in 1951. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned 2 GE 45-ton locomotives numbered 1 and 101. It has since acquired three Alco S-series switchers. Web site. Ed Vasser provides the following information:
In your description of the Louisville New Albany & Corydon, the second GE 45 ton No. 101 was the former Ferdinand Railroad locomotive. On the page you link two, showing LNAC 86 and one of the re-engined ALCo's (No. 1000) all of those have been scrapped and they currently only operate with the mentioned former Iowa Interstate ALCo RS-36. They have a couple of other locomotives on the property, but don't appear to use them. The line was acquired by Lucas Oil Corp in 2006 and seems to be known as Lucas Oil Rail Lines (LORL) now although I can't verify those reporting marks. I've been by there several times since Lucas Oil took over the line and service seems to be only on an as needed basis. Here's a link to a little information about it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucas_Oil_Rail_Line The line currently operates an ex-Iowa Interstate RS-36, with a former IAIS C420 stored out of service.

Louisville, New Albany & Corydon 1951 ex-1 on display Corydon, IN 1990. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.


Former Iowa Interstate 850 ALCo C-420 Stored Out Of Service June 2004 Corydon, IN. Ed Vasser photo, used with permission.


Former Iowa Interstate 900 ALCo RS-36 - Current active motive power June 2004 Corydon, IN. Ed Vasser photo, used with permission.

Louisville and Wadley

Louisville to Wadley, GA. 10.0 miles. Web site.

Ludlow and Southern Railway

8 miles Ludlow to Camp Rochester, CA Web Site

McKeesport Connecting Railroad Company

7.264 miles. Locomotives (diesel), 6. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned seven Alco S2s, numbered 1001-1007.

Freight Equipment (July 1968 ORER)

GB	Gond.,Stl.Sides,Fixed Ends,Wooden Floor			100-174
GB	Gond.,Steel Sides, Fixed Ends, Flat Bot.,Steel Floor	1000-1098

McLaughlin Line Railroad

Switching line at Apollo, PA. 5 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned a GE 80-tonner numbered 4, a Porter 65-tonner numbered 7, and a GE 80-tonner numbered 12. The track is former Conrail. Metal Service Company owns the line.

Manufacturers' Junction Railway

Switching line at Cicero, IL. 2 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned 2 EMD SW1s numbered 6 and 7. Another SW1, 23, is now also on the roster.

Massena Terminal Railroad

Switching line in Massena, NY. 9 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns 2 EMD MP15s numbered 12 and 13. It was built in the early 20th century to serve an Alcoa plant, its only customer. It has been a RailAmerica property since 1995. Wikipedia entry.

Mercer Valley Railroad

3.99 miles Farrell, Pa. Locomotives, 10. Connected with Erie, NYC, and PRR at Farrell, Pa. Photo

Mexicano del Pacifico

Los Mochis, Mexico. 3 miles. Connected a sugar mill with the Chihuahua Pacific; used steam into the 1990s. Web site.

MG Rail

Terminal railroad at Jeffersonville, IN. 8 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns 1 EMD SW8 numbered 1210.

Michigan Shores Railroad

Switching railroad at Muskegon, MI. 8 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns 1 Alco RS-3 numbered 1077.

Middleburgh & Schoharie R.R. Co.

5.33 miles. Locomotives, 1. 1 combination car. (January 1928 ORER)

Middletown & Hummelstown Railroad

Middletown to Hummelstown, PA. 9 miles. The original M & H Railroad Company was formed in 1888 by local businessmen and construction of the line between its namesake Boroughs was completed in 1890. From then until 1976 the line was part of the Reading Railroad. Since 1976, the Middletown & Hummelstown Railroad has been an independent company. Freight service has been provided since 1976 and tourist passenger service has been provided since 1986. Company web site.

Midway Railroad Company

4.9 miles. Columbus, OH. Connected with the Norfolk and Western and the Chesapeake and Ohio. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned one EMD SW1, number 512. The line was formerly known as the Ohio Midland Railway and was apparently owned by the Ohio Midland Light and Power Company.

Midwest Coal Handling Company

Drakesboro to Central City, KY. 7 miles. Forner Louisville & Nashville branch line.

Minatitlan Railroad

The U.S. Department of Commerce 1942 Latin American Transportation Survey of "The Railways of Mexico" lists this railroad as 7 miles long, linking El Carmen on the National Tehuantepec RR with Minatitlan (1939 stats - 44 employees, 4 locomotives, 37 boxcars, 25 oil tank cars, 3 passenger cars - 50,665 passengers carried in 1939, 3,742 carloads of freight transported in 1939, operating ratio 197.76 in 1939). The line was listed in the April 1916 issue of TRAVELERS RAILWAY GUIDE and was still listed in the 1954 Official Guide. It was absorbed by NdeM as Distrito de Minatitlán (Línea "ZA"), later renamed Patio de Hibueras. It primarily serves the PEMEX Refinería Minatitlán, and still operated by Ferrosur.

Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway

Switching road at International Falls, MN. 4 miles. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owns 5 Alco S-2s numbered 15-20. Roster site.

Mobile & Gulf Railroad

Variously listed as 10 or 11 miles. Brownville to Buhl, AL. The Baskett Lumber & Manufacturing Company built a standard gauge logging railroad about 31 miles long based at Fayette, AL in 1913. In 1918, W. P. Brown & Sons Lumber Company acquired the Baskett railroad and its remaining equipment. The logging line acquired the name “Mobile & Gulf Railroad,” but as yet was not incoporated. The Mobile & Gulf Railroad was incorporated in 1925 to acquire and operate the railroad. It was controlled by the W. P. Brown & Sons Lumber Company. In 1948 the section of line between Fayette and Brownville was abandoned, leaving about 11 miles in operation between Brownville and Buhl, where it connected with the GM&O. Web site, from which the information above was obtained. Locomotives included 1 and 9, Baldwin 2-6-0s built new for the line, and number 97, a Baldwin stock 8-30D 2-6-0 built for service in Cuba but never delivered. It was eventually acquired by the M&G in 1948 and ran on the line until 1970, one of the last steam locomotives in regular US service. (A full steam locomotive roster is at the link above.) According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the Mobile & Gulf later had a GE 70-ton numbered 98.

Modesto and Empire Traction Company

5 miles. Modesto, CA. Locomotives (oil burning) 3; 4 cars. Connects with Southern Pacific, Santa Fe, and Tidewater Southern at Modesto, CA. (January 1928 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned six GE 70-tonners numbered D-600 through D-605. Web Site. The following information is courtesy of Harold Reeve:
The M&ET currently own 10 operating GE 70-ton locomotives numbered 600 through 609. The locomotives have no D designation in front of the numbers. The M&ET currently owns no rolling stock. The railroad remains operational and profitible, serving the Beard Industrial District and Gallo Winery among other Modesto Industries and connecting with the Union Pacific in Modesto (west end of the line) and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe in Empire (east end of the line). Since the Tidewater Southern Division of the Union Pacific tracks through Modesto were removed in 2003, the west end of the line was modified and now connects only with Union Pacific at the former Southern Pacific tracks.
An article on the M&ET and modeling one of their 70 tonners appeared in the April 2004 RMC. An article on the line also appeared in the February, 1987 Model Railroader. 70-tonner 613 was purchased in 2005. Some used engines purchased to add to the 70-tonner fleet were never rebuilt and just used for parts, though numbered into the roster. 610, 611, and 612 never ran. The 606 and 609 were in a wreck and scrapped. At the end it took 2 to 3 to pull the trains. It took 5 to bring in an 80 car UP grain train 10,000 tons and 6 to 7 to bring in a 100 car grain train 14,000 tons. SW1500s 1500 and 1501 were purchased in 2006. RP20B Gensets 2000 and 2001 were purchased in 2008, while RP20B gensets 2000-2008 were purchased in 2009, when the 70-tonners were all retired.


Bachmann HO scale GE 70 ton diesels painted for the MET by a German modeler who posts on US forums as "faraway". Photo used by permission.

Monongahela Connecting Railroad Co.

6.86 miles. Locomotives (diesel electric) 33. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned three GE 100 ton locos numbered 100 and 110-111; two GE 80-ton locos numbered 101-102; 17 Alco S2s numbered 137, 144-149, 151-159, and 177; six Alco S4s numbered 138-143; one GE 115-tonner numbered 150; six GE 126-tonners numbered 160-163 and 175-176; an Alco T6 numbered 400; an Alco RS-11 numbered 700; and an Alco C415 numbered 701.

Freight equipment (July 1968)

GB	Gond, stl, fixed ends, flat bot.Stl.Floor	200-249
GB	Gond, stl, fixed ends, flat bot.Stl.Floor	250-279
HT	Hopper, steel					600-614
HT	Hopper, steel					625-634
HT	Hopper, steel					635-684
HT	Hopper, steel					850-869
FM	Flat, steel underframe				1100-1118
HT	Hopper, steel					1600-1614
HT	Hopper, steel					1615-1624
HT	Hopper, steel					1650-1661
HT	Hopper, steel					1662-1676
HTC	Hopper, steel					1700-1734
HTC	Hopper, steel					1735-1750
HTC	Hopper, steel					1751-1763
HTC	Hopper, steel					1764-1773
HT	Hopper, steel					1800-1844
GB	Gond., wood floor				1900-1909
GB	Gond., stl., with covers			1910-1915
GB	Gond., stl., fixed ends, flat bot., stl. floor	2500-2699
GB	Gond., stl., fixed ends, flat bot., stl. floor	2725-2899

From the September/October 2003 Diesel Era:

Monongahela Connecting Railroad served as a connection from Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp. steel mills in south Pittsburgh to the Pennsylvania, Baltimore & Ohio, and Pittsburgh & Lake Erie railroads. It began dieselizing its operations in 1936 with General Electric center-cab units, ranging in weight from 80 tons to 120 tons.

After World War II, MCRR acquired a fleet of Alco-buit S-2s and S-4s. The carrier's first road-type locomotive came in 1957 with a single RS-11 from Alco. In 1968, MCRR returned to Alco for a T-6 and a C-415. . . . Between 1974 and 1976, EMD built five SW1001s for the carrier.

The steady decline of the domestic steel-making business reduced the need for additional locomotives. A railroad that in 1966 operated 33 locomotivew and employed 772 people was reduced to 11 units and 204 employees by the end of 1982.

Morehead & North Fork Railroad

Morehead to Clearfield, KY 4 miles. Construction began in 1906 on a line of about 25 miles to Redwine, KY, shortened to 4 miles in 1933. It connected with the C&O in Morehead. It mainly hauled lumber, limestone, and clay. In the 1950s and 60s, the line attracted considerable railfan interest by operating steam well after most other railroads had dieselized. Locomotives included 10, a 2-8-0 built by Cooke in 1926 for the Mobile and Gulf; 11, a 2-6-2 built by Baldwin in 1909 for the Kanawha, Glen Jean, & Eastern; 12, an 0-6-0 built by Pittsburgh in 1905 for the Southern; and 14, an Alco 0-6-0 built as Union Railroad 77. Link to a Trains article from January, 1956 The M&NF acquired two Alco S-1s in 1963 and three Baldwin RS-12s from the Durham & Southern, 1200 and 1202 in 1974, and 1201 as a parts unit in 1977. In 1982, the railroad's main customer, a lumber yard that had been the Lee Clay plant, burned down, and in 1985, CSX abandoned the line to the connection in Morehead. The RS-12s were scrapped on site in 2010 and 2011. Photos show a boxcar numbered 500 and a gas-electric car numbered 200.

Moscow, Camden, & San Augustine Railroad

7 miles, Camden, TX Locomotives (oil burning) 1, passenger car, 1 (January 1928 ORER) Web Site

There was an article on this line in the December, 1971 Railroad Model Craftsman by Bob Walker, "Red Combine to Moscow". This included photos of equipment and structures, as well as track plans for the end stations. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had one GE 44-tonner numbered 17, a former Pacific Electric and Texas & New Orleans loco that was acquired in 1960 as the line's first diesel. It ran for a number of years in Southern Pacific paint and lettering. However, even before the interesting diesel, it was the last common carrier in Texas to operate a steam locomotive. The Camden facility included a locomotive graveyard where a number of former W.T.Carter and MC&SA steam locomotives were stored.

Moshassuck Valley Railroad Company

Providence to Saylesville, RI, 4.9 miles. Connected at Providence with the New Haven. Equipment (January 1928 ORER): Locomotives, 2; box, 28; coal, 6. Equipment was not used in interchange. Now operated as part of Providence & Worcester. Link with photos. From the link, "It ran from the bleachery yard in the Saylesville section of Lincoln, Rhode Island to a junction in the Woodlawn section of Pawtucket, Rhode Island with its only connection, the New Haven Railroad. In its early days it had a fleet of freight equipment and ran a steam driven passenger car between Woodlawn and the mill yard in Saylesville for the employees, simply called the Dummy!"

According to a post on the Providence & Worcester Yahoo group,

According to P&W's 1981 Annual Report, the P&W purchased the Moshassuck Valley Railroad on September 1, 1981. In addition, the September 1981 issue of the Narragansett Newsletter states that immediately after the purchase, both of MV's center-cab GE's were moved to Worcester and P&W locomotives began operating on the MV. At Worcester, MV's 65-ton GE number 9 was painted green and became the Warwick Railway number 106. The unit was delivered to the Warwick Railway on October 26, 1981.

I'm quite sure that the lines designation was changed from "Industrial Track" to "Running Track" in the late Nineties (after 1995).

Mount Vernon Terminal Railway

Switching road at Mount Vernon, WA. 2.5 miles. Web page. The railroad was originally built by the Puget Sound & Cascade Railway in 1916. Track in downtown Mount Vernon was acquired in 1933 from Pacific Northwest Traction Company. The PS&C was abandoned in 1939, and the track in Mount Vernon was turned over to Mount Vernon Terminal Railway. The link above shows that the MVT originally operated with a series of Plymouth diesels. According to the Kalmbach Diesel Locomotive Rosters (Third Edition), the line owned 1 Baldwin VO-1000 numbered 505. This was retired in 1994, and an SW9 numbered 1200 was acquired in 1993. On March 23, 2005, MVT filed to abandon the southern end of its line from mp 0.369 to 1.172.

Muncie and Western Railroad Company

4 miles Muncie, IN Locomotives (gasoline) 2. (January 1928 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned three Plymouth model HLs numbered 1-3; a Plymouth model MLB numbered 4; a Plymouth WLG 0-6-0 numbered 5; a Davenport 50-tonner numbered 6; a GE 65 tonner numbered 7; and a GE 70 tonner numbered 8.

Accordng to "Modeling a Muncie & Western R.R. wood boxcar" by Montford L. Switzer in the July, 2010, Railroad Model Craftsman, "The 5.6 mile long switching railroad was owned by the Ball Brothers Glass Manufacturing Company, well known throughout the United States as the producer of Ball Mason Patent glass canning jars and other canning supplies. The MWR's purpose in life was to switch the five-plus miles of track in and around the Ball Brothers industrial complex." The MWR operated a fleet of leased boxcars painted yellow; extensive details of this fleet are given in the RMC article.

Muncie and Western Plymouth HL 2. Photographer unkown, image apparently in public domain.


Proto 2000 Mather box car lettered for Muncie and Western.

Municipal Docks Railway of the Jacksonville Port Authority

10 miles. Locomotives, 1. Jacksonville, FL (July 1968 ORER)

Narragansett Pier Railroad Co.

8.03 miles Peace Dale, RI Locomotives (coal burning) 1. (January 1928 ORER) Web Site According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned two Plymouth ML-6s numbered 30 and 33; a Plymouth of unknown model numbered 35; a 35-ton GE numbered 38; and a 65-ton Vulcan numbered 40.
Passenger Equipment

Coaches -- E,F,G
Combination Passenger and Baggage -- D,E
Baggage -- A
Gasoline Motor Car -- 9,10

The Natchez, Urania & Ruston Railway Co.

2.56 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 1. Connects with Missouri Pacific at Urania, LA. (July 1968 ORER). The early history of the line is covered in the ICC Tap Line Case decision:
The Natchez, Urania & Ruston Railway is controlled by the stock-holders of the Urania Lumber Company through ownership of the entire capital stock. The two companies are one investment and the officers are identical. It extends from a connection with the Iron Mountain at Urania, La., into the timber about 14 miles. The road was originally constructed in 1899 by the Urania Lumber Company as a private logging road. It was incorporated March 29, 1902, under the laws of Louisiana, with a capital stock of $100,000, of which $50,000 has been issued for the purchase of the road from the lumber company. This purchase only covered the steel, ties, and equipment, the lumber company retaining the title to the right of way. There are no bonds. The equipment consists of 2 locomotives and 24 cars. The lumber company owns no equipment or motive power. The mill of the lumber company is located at Urania, about 300 yards from the connection with the Iron Mountain. There are no other mills in operation on the line. The lumber company owns about 50 per cent of the timber tributary to the tap line. There is no other timber owned in sufficient quantities to justify a mill operation.

Newburgh & South Shore

Miles of road operated: 5.46 Equipment. Locomotives -- Diesel-electric; (Nos. 1005-1020, 1201 and 1202), 14. (ORER)

From the September/October 2003 Diesel Era:

Originally owned by U.S.Steel, Newburgh & South Shore operated five-plus miles of tracks (in the 1960s) around the Cleveland area. The line began dieselizing in 1939 with an Alco HH-1000. A second HH-1000, seven Alco S-1s, and eight S-2s completed the roster until the acquisition of [two] T-6s in 1969, although four of the S-1s were rebuilt to S-2 specificaitons between 1955 and 1957. . . . In 1969, the first of five EMD SW1001s arrived as the carrier began the process of renewing its locomotive fleet.

A general decline in the steel industry in the 1980s rendered the railroad surplus, and USS abandoned the line in early 1986. In July 1986, the line was sold to Chicago West Pullman interests, which restored service with two of the SW1001s, retaining the N&SS name. The line, which is currently owned by Omnitrax, consists of 3.2 miles of track.

Northampton and Bath R.R. Co.

7.283 miles. Locomotives (diesel), 2. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned two EMD NW2s, numbered 1001-1002. This was a US Steel railroad.

Freight equipment (July 1968 ORER)

XM	Box, All Steel				501 to 550
XM	Box, All Steel				703 to 866
XM	Box, All Steel				901 to 950
LO	Bulk Cement, Covered Hopper, Steel	3626 to 3650
LO	Bulk Cement, Covered Hopper, Steel	3626 to 3650
NE	Caboose					102,103

Oakland Terminal Railway

10 miles. Oakland, CA. Wikipedia entry. Railfan site. The OTR was jointly acquired in 1943 by the Western Pacific Railroad and Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway to take over the Key System's freight railroad known as the Oakland Terminal Railroad. Today, the OTR operates on 10 miles of track and handles about 1,600 cars per year (1998 figure). It is jointly owned by the Union Pacific Railroad and BNSF Railway. The railroad operates in the industrial area around the Oakland Army Base.

The Oakland Terminal had one steam locomotive, a 1923 Baldwin 2-6-2 number 4. It had a Baldwin DS-44-1000 number 101 and an Alco S-1 number102. It currently operates GP7 number 97 and leases GP9R 5623, which is painted in the Southern Pacific black widow scheme.

Owasco River Railway

4 miles. Auburn, NY Locomotives, 2 Wikipedia entry. This was an industrial line that ran along the streets of Auburn, NY. In its later years, it was owned 50-50 by the Lehigh Valley and New York Central and was abandoned sometime in the late 1960s. This source says it operated a 3-truck Shay.
Box 502, 503, 506, 511	4
Gondola	2000, 2002
Gondola 2001
Flat 2003, 2004
Flat 120
Flat 122
Flat 123
Flat 124
Flat 200 to 204

Parr Terminal Railroad

1.9 miles. Locomotives (gasoline), 2. Connects with Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe and Southern Pacific at Richmond, CA. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned three Plymouth locos, an 0-6-0 numbered 1 and two 0-4-0s numbered 2 and 3. Wikipedia entry The line operated a port facility in Richmond, California. It was taken over by the Levin-Richmond Terminal Corporation and renamed the Richmond Pacific Railroad.

Parr Terminal Plymouth 3. Don Ross photo, used by permission.

Freight equipment (July 1968 ORER) Not used in interchange

GB	Gond.,Steel,Fixed Ends	1
GB	Gond.,Steel,Fixed Ends	2 to 4
GB	Gond.,Steel,Fixed Ends	5,6

Pearl River Valley Railroad Company

4.69 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 1. Connects with Southern (NO&NE) at Nicholson, MS (July 1968 ORER). This line was constructed as a lumber railroad and shortened to its final length in 1938. It was abandoned in 2007. It had a Baldwin 2-6-0 numbered 231 and an Alco 2-6-0 numbered 331. It had one GE 45 tonner, number unknown, and one GE 65 tonner, number 101. In 1977 it had a fleet of 50 IPD boxcars. This site has a history, steam roster, and photos of steam and diesel locos.

Peoria, Hanna City and Western Railway Co.

9-1/2 miles. Peoria, IL. Locomotives, 3. Connections: With Chicago & North Western Ry.

Peninsula Terminal Company

2.2 miles. North Portland, OR, connecting with UP and BNSF. Listing on Union Pacific web site. The railroad was incorporated in 1916, and was leased to UP and Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railroad until 1931. It is now owned by Larry Kirkeby and John Manos, effective July 1, 1994.

Pioneer & Fayette Railroad

0.5 miles, Franklin Junction, OH. Wikipedia entry, courtesy of Ed Vasser. There is additional information and a track diagram on that site. The P&F began operations in 1935. About 1943, the P&F was cut back to 0.5 miles of track at Franklin Junction and freight was trans-loaded onto P&F trucks for final delivery. Motive power was a Plymouth 25-ton model HL 4-wheel gasoline locomotive (builder plate #3835) built in 1936. The locomotive was first numbered 102 and later became number 10.

PF 102 - Plymouth 25 Ton Model HL-4 Franklin Junction, OH 1991 Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

Pittsburgh & Ohio Valley Ry. Co.

6.3 miles. Performs a General Freight service on Neville Island, Pa. Freight cars owned: None. (July 1968 ORER) This was an industrial railroad for Shenango Steel on Neville Island in Pittsburgh, PA. It was absorbed by CSX.

Port Bienville Railroad

Length: unknown. Hancock County, MS. Web Site.

Port Royal Railroad

Length: unknown. Charleston, SC. Web Site

Quincy Railroad Company

Quincy to Quincy Jct., CA 6 miles. Locomotives, 2. 1 car. (July 1968 ORER) According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a GE 44-ton loco numbered 3. The Wikipedia entry indicates the line later shrank to 3.2 miles and acquired an EMD SW1200.

Sandersville Railroad

Tennille, GA to Kaolin, 9.1 miles. Web site. Company web site. In the 1928 Official Railroad Equipment Register, it was listed as 4 miles long, with 2 locomotives and one flat car numbered 501 with a steel underframe, 37 feet long. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line owned one FM H12-44, originally numbered 100 (1st), then renumbered to 10; an EMD SW1200 numbered 200; and two EMD SW1500s numbered 100 (2nd) and 300.

Skaneateles Short Line Railroad

Skaneateles to Skaneateles Jct., NY 5 miles. Web Site According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a 44-ton GE numbered 6 and a 45-ton GE numbered 7.

Southern Indiana Railway

Watson to Speed, IN, 5.45 miles. SIND operates from a connection with CSX at Watson to Speed. They also have a connection with the Louisville & Indiana Railroad at Speed, IN. The line operates a GE 65-ton diesel numbered 101 and two Alco S-2 switchers repowered with Caterpillar diesels numbered 103 and 104. There may also be an 80 Ton GE on the property. Traffic is cement.

Southern Indiana Railway GE 65-ton 101 Sellersburg, IN 1997. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.


Southern Indiana Railway Alco S-2m 103 Sellersburg, IN 1997. Ed Vasser photo, used by permission.

Southern New York Railway Incorporated

2.4 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. Connects with Delaware & Hudson at Oneonta, NY (July 1968 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a 40 ton GE numbered 5 and a 50-ton GE numbered 300.

Tbis line started as an electric interurban that gradually cut back on passenger service until, in 1940, all wire was taken down and all track removed except a short segment between Oneonta and West Oneonta, NY, which was switched with diesels.

Southern San Luis Valley Railroad

1.53 miles. Blanca, CO. Owned a home-built B-B switcher D-500 built from a steam locomotive tender.

Springfield Terminal Railway Company

5.87 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 1. Miscellaneous, 1. Connects with Boston & Maine at Charlestown, NH. (July 1968 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had one GE 44-tonner numbered 1.

Stewartstown Railroad

Stewartstown to New Freedom, PA. 7 miles. Web site. Another web site.

Stewartstown 25-ton Plymouth 6. Photographer unkown, image apparently in public domain.

Stewartstown 35-ton Plymouth 9. Photographer unkown, image apparently in public domain.


Strasburg Rail Road

Strasburg to Leaman Place, PA. 4.5 miles. Wikipedia entry. Company web site.

Texas & Northern Railway Company

7.6 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 10. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had six Alco S4 switchers numbered 10,11,13-16; one Alco S1 numbered 12; one Alco S2 numbered LSS-12, and four other Alcos of unknown model numbered LSS-8 through LSS-11.

Texas Transportation Company

1.1 miles in San Antonio, TX. Web site.

Thousand Islands Railway Company

3.32 miles. Connects with Canadian National at Gananoque Jct., ON Locomotives (Nos. 44, 271), 2.
Web site. From the web site:
The Thousand Islands Railway was formed in 1884 by the Rathburn family, who controlled a large amount of the mining and logging interests in South-Eastern Ontario. The line ran from Gananoque to Gananoque Jct, where it connected to the Grand Trunk Railway, mostly along the shore of the Gananoque River, to the St. Lawrence River. In 1910, the Rathburns sold the TIR to the Grand Trunk Railway. Thirteen years later the Grand Trunk was merged into what is now Canadian National Railways. From 1884 to 1962, the TIR remained a separate railway. Under Grand Trunk and Canadian National control, the railway operated as a separate subsiderary, with its own board of directors and President.

1958, the Town of Gananoque ended a 74 year tax exemption on the railway. This was started to ensure that the town always had rail service. Once the exemption was ended, the railway started to lose money. By 1962, daily passenger service ended and the Thousand Islands Railway was finally merged into the Canadian National. Traffic ceased to travel the southern portion of the line, from the Stelco (now GFSI) Plant on River Street to the waterfront, in 1981. The rails for that line were removed in 1985.

Flat 500 1
Snow Flanger 460 1
Coaches -- 200, 202

Toledo, Angola & Western Railway Company

10.50 miles. Toledo, OH. According to the January 1928 ORER, the line owned 2 coal burning steam locomotives. It had 5 30-foot gondolas with steel underframes, numbered 1 to 5.

Tooele Valley Railway Co.

7 miles. Locomotives (coal burning), 2. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned an EMD SW1200 numbered 100 and an EMD SW900 numbered 104.
Freight Equipment

Flat 20,21 2
Ore, Hopper bottom 101 to 130
Ore, Hopper bottom 121 to 160
Ore, Hopper bottom 161 to 178
Ore, Hopper bottom 179, 180
Ore, Hopper bottom 181 to 183
Ore, Hopper bottom 184 to 186
Ore, Hopper bottom 187 to 200
Ore, steel 501 to 525
Caboose 02
Passenger cars, 8; combination cars, 2.

Trinity Valley Southern RR. Co.

6 miles, Trinity, TX. Locomotives, 2. Cars, 1. (January 1928 ORER)

Unity Railways Company

5.30 miles. Connects with Bessemer and Lake Erie at Unity Jct., PA and Penn Central at Renton Jct., PA. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned an EMD SW8 numbered 53. The line also acquired a caboose from the New York, Ontario & Western when it was abandoned in 1957.

Virginia Central

According to Wikipedia, "The Potomac, Fredericksburg, & Piedmont Railroad (PF&P RR) operated 38 miles (61 km) of 3 foot gauge railroad between Fredericksburg (with a connection to the Richmond, Fredericksburg, & Potomac Railroad) and Orange (with a connection to the Orange & Alexandria railroad). It operated as narrow gauge until after World War I. In 1926, the line was standard gauged and the name changed to the Virginia Central Railway. In 1938, the entire line was abandoned except for a one mile segment in Fredericksburg which lasted until 1983." According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the railroad owned two Plymouths, a WLG numbered 200 and a WE numbered 500.

Virginia Central Plymouth 200. Ken Houghton photo, used by permission.


Virginia Central Plymouth 500. Warren Calloway photo, used by permission.

Ware Shoals Railroad Company

5 miles. Locomotives (diesel electric) 1. Connects with Seaboard Coast Line and Southern at Shoals Jct., SC (January 1984 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line had one GE 44-tonner numbered 1955.

Warrenton Railroad Company.

3 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric), 2. Connects with Seaboard Coast Line at Warren Plans, NC. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned a 45 ton Whitcomb numbered 6. Freight equipment from January 1984 ORER
LO	Covered Hop, 4 compartments, gravity outlets, trough hatch	14100-14229
LO	Covered Hop, 3 compartments, gravity outlets, trough hatch	15000-15199
LO	Covered Hop, 4 compartments, gravity outlets, trough hatch	15200-15299
LO	Covered Hop, 3 compartments, gravity outlets, trough hatch	16000-16099
LO	Covered Hop, 4 compartments, gravity outlets, trough hatch	16100-16499

From Richard E. Prince's Seaboard Air Line book: "[T]he WARRENTON RAIL ROAD was organized and opened three miles to Warren Plains in 1884. The first locomotive No. 1 was acquired second hand from the Richmond & Petersburg RR in 1884. No. 2 was 0-4-2T built new for the railroad by Porter (s/n 858) in 1887. No. 3 came new from Baldwin (s/n 27916) in in 1906. Finally, Warrenton RR No. 4 2-4-2, a real monster complete with tender, was built by Baldwin (s/n 55467) in 1922 . . ."

Warwick Railroad Company

Opened South Auburn to Oakland Beach, Rhode island, 8.5 miles, in 1875. It became the Rhode Island Central Railroad in 1879, and later became part of a street railway. Freight operations were continued by the Warwick Railroad, at first under electric power. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the line had a 28-ton GE electric numbered 100 (later converted to gas-electric); a 40-ton GE numbered 101; a 30-ton GE electric numbered 102 (partially convereted to gas-electric but scrapped); a Plymouth ML-6 type 3 numbered 103; an Atlas 50-ton numbered 104; and a Vulcan 65-ton numbered 105. The Warwick Railroad was acquired by the Providence & Worcester Railroad in 1980. Moshassuck Valley's 65-ton GE number 9 was painted green and became the Warwick Railway number 106. The unit was delivered to the Warwick Railway on October 26, 1981.

Wildwood and Delaware Bay Short Line RR Co.

4.2 miles Wildwood Jct. and Winslow Jct., NJ (January 1928 ORER)

Winifride Railroad Company

6.447 miles. Winifride Jct to North Branch, West Virginia. Connected with C&O at Winifride Jct. It was constructed during 1881 and 1882 to serve mines owned by the Winifride Coal Company. It closed in 1988.

Wyandotte Southern Railroad Company

3.98 miles. Locomotives (diesel-electric) 1. Freight equipment, none. Connections: Conrail at Wyandotte, MI; Detroit, Toledo, and Ironton at Wyandotte, MI. (January 1984 ORER). According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned one Baldwin DS-4-4-660 numbered D-100.

Wyandotte Terminal Railroad Company

9.9 miles. Wyandotte, MI Locomotives (coal burning) 7. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned one GE 65-tonner numbered 1; three Baldwin VO-660s numbered 101-103; and one Baldwin DS-4-4-660 numbered 104.
Box, wood	30	1
Gondola, Steel	967 to 986	20
Twin Hopper	917 to 966	50

Terminal railroad at Wyandotte, MI connecting with New York Central, Michigan Central, and Detroit, Toledo and Ironton.

Yancey Railroad

This is the former Black Mountain Railroad (see above). It had extended to 12.83 miles by the time of its entry in the July 1960 ORER. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, it owned a GE 44 tonner numbered 1 and a GE 50 tonner numbered 2. The line was abandoned after its bridge connecting it to the Clinchfield was damaged by a flood in 1977. Web site.

Youngstown and Northern Railroad Co.

4.80 miles. Locomotives, diesel, 8. According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, the Youngstown and Northern owned two GM NC switchers numbered 201-202, three Alco HH900 switchers numbered 211-212 and 217, nine Alco S2 switchers numbered 213-216, 218-221, and 224, four Alco S2 switchers numbered 222, 223, 225, and 226, and an Alco RS-2 numbered 221.

Sign on former Youngstown and Northern enginehouse, McDonald, OH September 19, 2003

Freight equipment (July 1968 ORER)
GB	Gondola, Steel, Fixed Ends, Steel Floor	1300-1449
GB	Gondola, Steel, Fixed Ends, Steel Floor	1600-1699
GB	Gondola, Steel, Fixed Ends, Steel Floor	1700-1799
HM	Hopper, Steel				1951-1977
HM	Hopper, Steel				2000-2014
Caboose	47,101,103,104,105

Yreka Western Railroad Company

8 miles. Locomotives (Diesel-electric, 2; oil-burning, 2); total 4. Other: miscellaneous, 2. Total, 2. (January 1984 ORER) Web Site According to the Railroad Magazine rosters, this line owned two Baldwin 2-8-2 steam locos numbered 18 and 19, an EMD SW8 numbered 602, and two Alco S1 switchers numbered 603 and 604. It is covered in Jack Wagner, Short Line Junction, 2nd edition (Fresno, CA, Valley Publishers, 1971). Company web site. According to the web site,
April 15, 2008- The Central Oregon and Pacific Railroad ( CORP) failed to secure a new shipping agreement with the shippers for the Siskiyou line, from Black Butte to Medford. This failure to obtain a new contract impacted the financial outcome of the Yreka Western Railroad, as it connects to the CORP in Montague. Negotiations have been ongoing to resolve this shipping dilemma and restore freight service. During this time, Yreka Western Railroad, which is owned by the non-profit Rocky Mountain Railway & Mining Museum, has seen a loss in most freight revenue and has seen its 2008 tourism numbers severely impacted by the flailing economy and California wildfires. Due to these and other factors, the Yreka Western Railroad has been forced to put on hold its tourist railroad operation.

Freight Equipment 1984

XP	Box, Stl., end of car cushioning, double 8 foot offset doors	25101-25200
XM	Box, Stl., end of car cushioning, double 8 foot offset doors	25101-25200

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